Agape, Philautia, and Metta

I came across this article today, and it provides a nice summary of the Greek sensibilities toward the various forms of love.

With Metta and Karuna, the Buddha certainly taught (with joy and equanimity) in a very defined way the “divine/noble abodes” of human practice and existence. This complex approach toward love may explain why a complex translation of “Metta” is best expressed by the word " love, " but not in the romantic or western sense.

It’s interesting to read of the Greek perspective. " Looking for an antidote to modern culture’s emphasis on romantic love? Perhaps we can learn from the diverse forms of emotional attachment prized by the ancient Greeks."

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The Piyavagga Dhp 209 contains many kinds of non-metta love.

From endearment (piyato) springs grief, from endearment springs fear. For one who is wholly free from endearment there is no grief, whence then fear?

From affection (pemato) springs grief, from affection springs fear. For one who is wholly free from affection there is no grief, whence then fear?

From attachment (ratiyā) springs grief, from attachment springs fear. For one who is wholly free from attachment there is no grief, whence then fear?

From lust (kāmato) springs grief, from lust springs fear. For one who is wholly free from lust there is no grief; whence then fear?

From craving (taṇhāya) springs grief, from craving springs fear. For one who is wholly free from craving there is no grief; whence then fear?

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