Añña vs pañña vs vipassana

I read in an scholar essay the following translations for the 1st of these words: añña as “right insight” and pañña as “discriminating insight”.

What about Vipasanna ?

What are the meaning of these three words in the EBTs?

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I’m posting a brief collection of suttas from the EBTs on Vipassana- its best to look at the definition of the word in context, rather than from elsewhere. I assert here that mention of the five aggregates subject to clinging, the four elements and the six sense bases and the process of perception arising from those bases refer to vipassana in practice, i.e. an experience rather than theoretical doctrinal exposition of how things are supposed to function –this also includes observable phenomena in the dependant (co)-origination, which is all of them except (physical) birth (jati).

Immediately contradicting myself, here’s a nice definition of vipassana by Bhanthe Gunaratana:

"Vipassana is derived from two roots. Vi is a prefix with a complex set of connotations. Passana means seeing or perceiving. The basic meaning is “seeing in a special way.” But there also is the connotation of both “into” and “through.” The whole meaning of the word is looking into something with clarity and precision, seeing each component as distinct, and piercing all the way through so as to perceive the most fundamental reality of that thing. This process leads to insight into the basic reality of whatever is being inspected. – https://tricycle.org/magazine/vipassana-meditation/

EBT Definition of vipassana is more technical and sparser. This sutta shows that vipassana can be practiced apart from Samatha:

"The individual who has attained internal tranquillity of awareness, but not insight into phenomena through heightened discernment, should approach an individual who has attained insight into phenomena through heightened discernment and ask him: ‘How should fabrications be regarded? How should they be investigated? How should they be seen with insight?’ The other will answer in line with what he has seen & experienced: ‘Fabrications should be regarded in this way. Fabrications should be investigated in this way. Fabrications should be seen in this way with insight.’ Then eventually he [the first] will become one who has attained both internal tranquillity of awareness & insight into phenomena through heightened discernment. AN 4.94

Vipassana can be practiced before samatha:

“Then there is the case where a monk has developed tranquillity preceded by insight. As he develops tranquillity preceded by insight, the path is born. He follows that path, develops it, pursues it. As he follows the path, developing it & pursuing it—his fetters are abandoned, his obsessions destroyed. AN4.170

Result of Vipassana:

“These two qualities have a share in clear knowing. Which two? Tranquillity (samatha) & insight (vipassana).
“When tranquillity is developed, what purpose does it serve? The mind is developed. And when the mind is developed, what purpose does it serve? Passion is abandoned. “When insight is developed, what purpose does it serve? Discernment is developed. And when discernment is developed, what purpose does it serve? Ignorance is abandoned. AN2.31 Vijjabhagiya sutta

Vipassana is required for becoming an arahanth:
AN10.71 + other results of…

Vipassana here, placed on a continuum from listening to the Dhamma, discussing the Dhamma, contemplating the Dhamma followed by vipassana -deeply seeing directly. Note: this has parallels to the factors of stream entry: association with spiritual friends, listening to the true Dhamma, contemplation and practicing the Dhamma -see Anudhamma suttas.

”Cattārome, bhikkhave, kālā sammā bhāviyamānā sammā anupa¬rivat¬ti¬yamānā anupubbena āsavānaṃ khayaṃ pāpenti. Katame cattāro? Kālena dhammassavanaṃ, kālena dhammasākacchā, kālena sammasanā, kālena vipassanā—ime kho, bhikkhave, cattāro kālā sammā bhāviyamānā sammā anupa¬rivat¬ti¬yamānā anupubbena āsavānaṃ khayaṃ pāpenti. AN4.147

Vipassana is an expression or development of the Noble eightfold path:

“Bhikkhus, these four are things. What four?
Bhikkhus, there are things to be thoroughly known and accurately perceived, there are things to be thoroughly known and dispelled, there are things to be thoroughly known and developed and there are things to be thoroughly known and realized.
Bhikkhus, what things should be thoroughly known and accurately perceived?
Bhikkhus, the five holding masses [ie dukkha] should be thoroughly known and accurately perceived.
Bhikkhus, what things should be thoroughly known and dispelled?
Bhikkhus, ignorance and the craving `to be’ should be thoroughly known and dispelled.[samudaya]
Bhikkhus, what things should be thoroughly known and developed?
Bhikkhus, calm and insight should be thoroughly known and developed.[magga]
Bhikkhus, what things should be thoroughly known and realized?
Bhikkhus, knowledge and release should be thoroughly known and realized.[niroda]
Bhikkhus, these are the four things.
Abhiññāvaggo - Thorough knowing, AN4.254, Abhiññāsuttāṃ - Thorough knowing

Vipassana leads to …non-returning:

”live delighting in seclusion, engage in practicing inner mental tranquility, not neglecting meditation, possessing insight, and frequenting empty places… Iti45

Vipassana and samatha is required for recalling ‘manifold past lives’:
MN6

Ven Revata praises vipassana practice (among other things):
MN32

Vipassana along with samatha leads to cessation of craving, aversion and delusion: Sn43.2

Vipassana is required for cessation of perception (nirodhasamapatti)
Two qualities are of great help in the attainment of the cessation of perception & feeling: tranquillity & insight." Sn41.6

Vipassana and Samatha leads to development of the Noble Eightfold Path and realization into the Four Noble Truths:

“And what, Bhikkhus, are the things to be fully understood by direct knowledge? It should be said: the five aggregates subject to clinging. What five? The form aggregate subject to clinging … the consciousness aggregate subject to clinging. These are the things to be fully understood by direct knowledge.
.
“And what, Bhikkhus, are the things to be abandoned by direct knowledge? Ignorance and craving for existence. These are the things to be abandoned by direct knowledge.
.
“And what, Bhikkhus, are the things to be realized by direct knowledge? True knowledge and liberation. These are the things to be realized by direct knowledge.
.
“And what, Bhikkhus, are the things to be developed by direct knowledge? Serenity and insight. These are the things to be developed by direct knowledge. Sn45.159

Katame ca, bhikkhave, dhammā abhiññā pariññeyyā? Pañ¬cupādā¬nak¬khan¬dhā¬tissa vacanīyaṃ. Katame pañca? Seyyathidaṃ—rūpupā¬dā¬nak¬khan¬dho … pe … viñ¬ñāṇupā¬dā¬nak¬khan¬dho. Ime, bhikkhave, dhammā abhiññā pariññeyyā. Katame ca, bhikkhave, dhammā abhiññā pahātabbā? Avijjā ca bhavataṇhā ca—ime, bhikkhave, dhammā abhiññā pahātabbā. Katame ca, bhikkhave, dhammā abhiññā sacchikātabbā? Vijjā ca vimutti ca—ime, bhikkhave, dhammā abhiññā sacchikātabbā. Katame ca, bhikkhave, dhammā abhiññā bhāvetabbā? Samatho ca vipassanā ca—ime, bhikkhave, dhammā abhiññā bhāvetabbā. Sn45.159

with metta

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Generally speaking, they have a similar meaning but are used in different (but overlapping) contexts.

  • paññā: This is a very general term, used widely in many contexts both doctrinal and everyday, and having a range of sense from mere “awareness”, “knowing”, to “intelligence”, to “understanding” and “wisdom”.
  • aññā: While the basic meaning is no different from paññā, this is used only in a specific doctrinal sense of the wisdom of awakening, and is essentially a synonym of bodhi.
  • vipassanā: In doctrinal contexts, this refers to the wisdom aspect of the process of meditation, and is most closely associated with the contemplation of impermanence, causality, and so on.
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Many thanks Banthe.