SuttaCentral

Discussion of texts on Anapanasati


#1

Q It seems like you know the dhamma quite well, do you know of a specific guide to attain jhanas (preferably through anapanasati)?

A “Right Mindfulness,” a book (available online) by Thanissaro is devoted to that topic, but not easy to read. The other comprehensive work is “Jhanas in Theravada Buddhist Meditation,” Gunaratana.


#2

Regarding ānāpānasati, I’m looking forward to Ven Anālayo’s forthcoming Mindfulness of Breathing: A Practice Guide and Translations (September 2019). Hope that helps. :anjal:


#3

Hi there @paul1, I dont think this threat belongs to Q&A as it is not a specific question for which there is a specific answer. Could we move it to Watercooler maybe?


#4

But it’s just received a specific answer, in the reference to Anālayo’s forthcoming book hasn’t it? ‘Specific answer’ doesn’t have to mean ‘one single correct answer’. :slight_smile:


#5

But it makes hard for the author of the thread to pick a right answer. It will end up becoming a discussion about texts on the topic…


#6

Although the breath is always in the background, the focus in the Anapanasati sutta moves to the body, and then to feelings. In general meditation, the development of joy becomes pivotal as an alternative when the transition from feelings of the flesh has to be made. It will be interesting to see if Analayo emphasizes the development of joy in the second tetrad.

“Even though a disciple of the noble ones has clearly seen as it actually is with right discernment that sensuality is of much stress, much despair, & greater drawbacks, still — if he has not attained a rapture & pleasure apart from sensuality, apart from unskillful mental qualities, or something more peaceful than that — he can be tempted by sensuality. But when he has clearly seen as it actually is with right discernment that sensuality is of much stress, much despair, & greater drawbacks, and he has attained a rapture & pleasure apart from sensuality, apart from unskillful mental qualities, or something more peaceful than that, he cannot be tempted by sensuality.”–-MN 14


#7

Is it an absolute requirement to pick a correct answer. I tend to regard that facility as something an OP writer can use if they wish, or not.
Several good answers can be just as satisfactory as one right one.

Only if readers fail to use restraint!!! … So it’s down to those of us who don’t have a helpful answer to contribute to keep our fingers off our keyboards … Now there’s a revolutionary idea. :wink: