SuttaCentral

EBTs not found in the modern Tipitaka?

I am looking for EBTs not found in the Pali Canon.

I already found this fantastic thread by Javier with his research. Any other sources?

I would also appreciate a list of suttas from the Agamas that are not found in the Pali Canon. Javier did not include material from the Agamas in his document.

Thank you.

Here’s some Āgamas without Pali parallels (or are significantly different but have bits that are also found in Pali suttas) that I’ve translated so far:

Dīrgha Āgama

DĀ 11 Increasing One by One
DĀ 12 Three Categories

These are both similar to DN 34 Dasuttara Sutta, but smaller.

Madhyama Āgama

MĀ 7 Worldly Merit
MĀ 72 The Legend of King Dīrghāyu
MĀ 80 The Rough Cloth

Ekôttarika Āgama

EĀ 24.5 Miraculous Transformations
EĀ 31.8 The Bodhisattva’s Austerities
EĀ 43.5 The Parable of the Raft
EĀ 50.6 Knowledge of Rebirth
EĀ 50.8 The Snake Parable

Saṃyukta Āgama

SĀ 35 Three Gentlemen
SĀ 38 Lowly
SĀ 86 Impermanent
SĀ 233 The World
SĀ 684 The Tathāgata and the Arhat
SĀ 723 Junior Monks
SĀ 737 Abodes of Mindfulness
SĀ 750 The Roots of Good and Bad
SĀ 785 The Eightfold Path

There’s more unique Āgamas than this. These are just the ones that I’ve translated so far.

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You might want to look into the work of Peter Skilling. He’s done translations of Tibetan material. Ditto Bhikkhuni Dhammadina.

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I can’t believe I have never seen your website before. What an amazing resource! Thank you!

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Like if I took these Suttas to Ajahn Brahmali would he say they’re legit EBT?

I have no idea what Ajahn Brahmali would say about it. These are sutras from early Buddhist traditions like the Theravada. I imagine the Avadana stories like the Legend of Dirghayu are later literary developments just as some of the Digha Nikaya sutras seem to be. Beyond that, most of them are on par with Nikaya texts, just from different canons. They may only appear to be unique because other parallels have been lost. Same is true for the suttas in the Nikayas that appear to be unique. Not all of the EBTs have survived to the present day.

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Right. And we’re still in our infancy in studying these things. Looking back at a lot of 20th century work on authenticity, while there was much progress, there’s also a lot of leaping to conclusions. Comparative method would suspect any sutta lacking parallels, but it’s certain there has been loss, so lack of parallels is just one indicator. One of the many reasons why translations are so important, to build up our fundamental basis of knowledge.

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You may be happy to know that a version of the Legend of Dirghayu [MĀ 72] can be found in the Pāli Vinaya. The Pāli legend is shorter and less fanciful, but essentially the same.

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Vinaya<->sutta parallels on SC are quite lacking!

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I’m going to share what is in a book of Ghandhara text by Solomon. It’s actually longer. But the part I’m sharing is teaching missing in Pali.

What is the concentration accompanied by perception of displeasure toward the whole world? Here, when a monk views a village as if it were no village, a city as if it were no city, the countryside as if it were no countryside, then he is dissatisfied with them, he ponders them, he does not enjoy them, he takes no pleasure in them. He tames and controls his mind toward them; he makes it [soft] and pliable. If, after he has tamed and controlled his mind toward them and has made it soft and pliable, he sees at another time a beautiful park, a beautiful forest, a beautiful pond, a beautiful [river], a beautiful land, or a beautiful mountain, then he is dissatisfied with them, he ponders them, he does not enjoy them, he takes no pleasure in them. He tames and controls his mind toward them; he makes it soft [and pliable]. After [he] has tamed and controlled his mind [toward them] and has made it soft and pliable, then at another time, [whatever he sees,] whether above and below, across, all around, everywhere, he is dissatisfied with it, ponders it, [does not enjoy it, takes no pleasure in it]. It is the undisturbed one-pointedness of mind of such a person that is meant by “the concentration accompanied by perception of displeasure toward the whole world.”

In The Buddhist Literature of Ancient Ghandhara

:pray:t4::pray:t4::pray:t4:

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