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Inspiring bhikkhunis and laywomen in the EBTs - sutta quotes

A while ago, I promised Bhante @Dhammarakkhita and @Gabriel to post some inspiring quotes from my collection of suttas about bhikkhunis and women in general. It took a few weeks for me to get around to doing this, but here it comes. This is not intended to be a complete list of all instances of inspiring women. Just my personal favourites. :wink:
This thread is intended for quotes from EBT sources. There’s a lot of stuff in the commentaries, Apadanas etc, too, but if anyone is interested in that, please start another thread. Thanks!

It is also just intended for inspiring quotes! :nun::buddha:

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OK, lets start with bhikkhunis who were highly accomplished, skilled at teaching the dhamma and at inspiring others. Of course, there is the famous MN44 with Ven. Dhammadinna, the foremost in teaching dhamma. And at AN 10.28, the Kajangala bhikkhuni teaches the laity 10 points. In both cases, the Buddha praises them for their wisdom afterwards.

the Blessed One told him:
“The bhikkhunī X is wise, the bhikkhunī X has great wisdom. If you had asked me the meaning of this, I would have explained it to you in the same way that the bhikkhunī X has explained it. Such is its meaning, and so you should remember it.”

There is bhikkhuni Khema, the foremost in wisdom and role model for all bhikkhunis (AN2.131), who wanders around seemingly alone in Kosala and ends up teaching the king at SN 44.1.

There is the bhikkhunı̄ named Khemā, a disciple of the Blessed One, the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One. Now a good report concerning this revered lady has spread about thus: ‘She is wise, competent, intelligent, learned, a splendid speaker, ingenious.’

And there is bhikkhuni Sukka at SN 10.9, who taught a large assembly, and whose teaching was so beautiful that even the Yakkhas moved around town to call people to come and listen.

“What has happened to these people in Rājagaha?
They sleep as if they’ve been drinking mead.
Why don’t they attend on Sukkā
As she teaches the deathless state?
“But the wise, as it were, drink it up—
That [Dhamma] irresistible,
Ambrosial, nutritious—
As travellers do a cloud.”

Even the devas came to venerate these accomplished bhikkhunis:
At AN 7.56, Brahma gods come to the Buddha to praise the liberated bhikkhunis. At Thig verse 365, Subha is venerated by Sakka and his retinue.

Then there is the entire chapter of SN 5, Bhikkhunisamyutta, which is full of self-confident, liberated nuns, and their beautiful replies to Mara’s temptations.

Nuns also occasionally taught the monks, as in Thig. 204 bhikkhuni Vaddhamata.

And of course, nuns taught nuns many times in the Thig.
Here’s a list of verse numbers:
54 (Sukkā),
204 (Vaddhamātā),
236ff (Punnikā teaching Brahmin),
274ff (Rohiṇī teaching father),
314ff Sundarī (teaching brahmin)
Teaching other bhikkhunis, 43, 69, 102-103, 125, 170
117ff: 30 Bhikkhunis with Paṭācārā
127ff: 500 Bhikkhunis with Paṭācārā

For a list of outstanding nuns, see also AN 1.235ff, the foremost disciples. :grin:

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I’ve also already posted a few quotes of independent, wandering, seclusion-loving nuns [elsewhere], but lets repost it here, too.

In the suttas nuns seem to have gone on alms round alone, spend the day in secluded spots, and also went wandering on long tours without any companion mentioned.

Alms round, seclusion: All of SN5, especially:
SN 5.1

Then, in the morning, the bhikkhuni Aḷavika dressed and, taking bowl and robe, entered Savatthi for alms. When she had walked for alms in Savatthi and had returned from her alms round, after her meal she went to the Blind Men’s Grove seeking seclusion.

SN 5.5

Then, in the morning, the bhikkhuni Uppalavaṇṇa dressed … she stood at the foot of a sal tree in full flower.
Then Mara the Evil One, desiring to arouse fear, trepidation, and terror in the bhikkhuni Uppalavaṇṇa, desiring to make her fall away from concentration, approached her and addressed her in verse:
“Having gone to a sal tree with flowering top,
You stand at its foot all alone, bhikkhuni.

Wandering without a companion mentioned :
SN 44.1 Bhikkhuni Khema wandering around in Kosala:

Now on that occasion the bhikkhunī Khema, while wandering on tour among the Kosalans, had taken up residence in Toraṇavatthu between Savatthī and Saketa. Then King Pasenadi of Kosala, while travelling from Saketa to Savatthī, took up residence for one night in Toraṇavatthu between Saketa and Savatthī. Then King Pasenadi of Kosala addressed a man thus: “Go, good man, and find out whether there is any ascetic or brahmin in Toraṇavatthu whom I could visit today.” …

In the Therigatha, there are numerous references to solitude, wandering etc.: (I compiled this list a while ago, and the references are to the verse numbers. I don’t know how to convert them to SC references without looking up every single one. Seems a bit much work since we don’t have an English translation anyway. Those who have the books or translations into other languages should be able to identify the verses easily enough.)
Alms food 2, 17, 110, 329, 349, 402
Wandering 14, 20, 110, 183, 332, 427
In the forest 51, 80, 372f
At the root of a tree 24, 75, 362
In the mountains 27, 29, 48, 108
Being alone, secluded 44, 57, 372f, 402

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This post is about nuns being deeply interested in dhamma and asking for profound teachings from the Buddha and senior monks.

Ayya Mahapajapati Gotami wants to practice in seclusion and asks for a specific teaching for her at AN 8.53.
A large group of 500 nuns requests ovada and reaches noble attainments at MN 146. According to Chinese parallels, they all reach arahantship.
A sangha of 1000 bhikkhunis approach the Buddha and receive teachings on stream-entry at SN55.11.
A group of bhikkhunis declare how they practice in accordance with the teachings and attain higher and higher stages of distinction at SN 47.10
A lovely little passage about the Jatilagahiya bhikkhuni - who doesn’t appear anywhere else - approaching Ananda in the middle of a forest to ask a profound dhamma question at AN 9.37

(Ānanda:) “Once, friend, I was dwelling at Sāketa in the deer park at Añjana Grove. Then the bhikkhunī Jaṭilagāhiyā approached me, paid homage to me, stood to one side, and said: ‘Bhante Ānanda, the concentration that does not lean forward and does not bend back, and that is not reined in and checked by forcefully suppressing [the defilements]—by being liberated, it is steady; by being steady, it is content; by being content, one is not agitated. Bhante Ānanda, what did the Blessed One say this concentration has as its fruit?’
“When she asked me this, I replied: ‘Sister, the concentration that does not lean forward and does not bend back, and that is not reined in and checked by forcefully suppressing [the defilements]—by being liberated, it is steady; by being steady, it is content; by being content, one is not agitated. The Blessed One said this concentration has final knowledge as its fruit.’

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I think one important aspect to see gender equality in the early teachings is also the “4 assemblies” and the “bhikkhus and bhikkhunis” teachings, and the fact that women are just mentioned alongside men so consistently and with such high frequency.
Here’s a selection of the most inspiring quotes:
My all-time favourite:
DN 16 / SN 51.10 / Ud 6.1 / AN 8.70

(Mara:) The Blessed Lord has said this: “Evil One, I will not take final Nibbāna till I have nuns and female disciples (monks, male disciples) who are accomplished, trained, skilled, learned, knowers of the Dhamma, trained in conformity with the Dhamma, correctly trained and walking in the path of the Dhamma, who will pass on what they have gained from their Teacher, teach it, declare it, establish it, expound it, analyse it, make it clear; till they shall be able by means of the Dhamma to refute false teachings that have arisen, and teach the Dhamma of wondrous effect.ʺ
‘And now, Lord, the Blessed Lord has such nuns and female disciples.

MN 73

“Apart from Master Gotama and the bhikkhus, is there any one bhikkhunī, Master Gotama’s disciple, who by realising for herself with direct knowledge here and now enters upon and abides in the deliverance of mind and deliverance by wisdom that are taintless with the destruction of the taints?”
“There are not only one hundred, Vaccha, or two or three or four or five hundred, but far more bhikkhunīs, my disciples, who by realising for themselves with direct knowledge here and now enter upon and abide in the deliverance of mind and deliverance by wisdom that are taintless with the destruction of the taints.”

If only Master Gotama and bhikkhus were accomplished in this Dhamma, but no bhikkhunīs were accomplished, then this holy life would be deficient in that respect; but because Master Gotama, bhikkhus, and bhikkhunīs are accomplished in this Dhamma, this holy life is thus complete in that respect.

DN 29.10.

‘But, Cunda, if the holy life is so circumstanced, and there is no teacher who is senior, of long standing, long-ordained, mature and advanced in seniority, then in such a case the holy life will be imperfect. But if such a teacher exists, then the holy life can be perfected in such a case.
‘If in such a case there is such a senior teacher, but if there are no senior disciples among the nuns (senior monks, middle nuns / monks, junior nuns / monks), who are experienced, trained, skilled, who have attained peace from bondage, who are able to proclaim the true Dhamma, able to refute any opposing doctrines that may arise by means of the true Dhamma, and, having done so, give a grounded exposition of Dhamma, then the holy life is not perfected.
‘If, however, all these conditions are fulfilled, then the holy life is perfected.’

DN 16.5.3

And yet, Ānanda, whatever monk, nun, male or female lay-follower dwells practising the Dhamma properly, and perfectly fulfils the Dhamma-way, he or she honours the Tathāgata, reveres and esteems him and pays him the supreme homage.

SN 8.12 (Vaṅgīsa:)

“Indeed, for the good of many,
The sage attained enlightenment,
For the bhikkhus and bhikkhunīs
Who have reached and seen the fixed course.

SN 42.7

“Headman, just like the field that is excellent are the bhikkhus and bhikkhunīs to me. I teach them the Dhamma that is good in the beginning, good in the middle, and good in the end, with the right meaning and phrasing; I reveal the holy life that is perfectly complete and pure. For what reason? Because they dwell with me as their island, with me as their shelter, with me as their protector, with me as their refuge.

AN 4.7

“Bhikkhus, these four kinds of persons who are competent, disciplined, self-confident, learned, experts on the Dhamma, practicing in accordance with the Dhamma, adorn the Saṅgha. What four?
“A bhikkhu / bhikkhunī / male / female lay follower who is competent, disciplined, self-confident, learned, an expert on the Dhamma, practicing in accordance with the Dhamma, adorns the Saṅgha.

AN 5.122

“Bhikkhus, if any bhikkhu or bhikkhunī develops and cultivates five things, one of two fruits is to be expected: either final knowledge in this very life or, if there is a residue remaining, the state of non-returning. What are the five? Here, a bhikkhu has mindfulness well established internally for [gaining] the wisdom that discerns the arising and passing away of phenomena; he dwells contemplating the unattractiveness of the body, perceiving the repulsiveness of food, perceiving non-delight in the entire world, and contemplating impermanence in all conditioned phenomena. If any bhikkhu or bhikkhunī develops and cultivates these five things, one of two fruits is to be expected: either final knowledge in this very life or, if there is a residue remaining, the state of non-returning.”

AN 7.59

“What is the cause and reason why, Bhante, the good Dhamma continues long after a Tathāgata has attained final nibbāna?”
“Here, Kimbila, after a Tathāgata has attained final nibbāna, (1) the bhikkhus, bhikkhunīs, male lay followers, and female lay followers dwell with reverence and deference towards the Teacher. (2) They dwell with reverence and deference towards the Dhamma. (3) They dwell with reverence and deference towards the Saṅgha. (4) They dwell with reverence and deference towards the training. (5) They dwell with reverence and deference towards concentration. (6) They dwell with reverence and deference towards heedfulness. (7) They dwell with reverence and deference towards hospitality. This is the cause and reason why the good Dhamma continues long after a Tathāgata has attained final nibbāna.”

DN 32.2 about serious practice in seclusion:

Now, Lord, there are disciples of the Blessed Lord who dwell in remote forest glades, where there is little noise or shouting, far from the madding crowd, hidden from people, suitable for retreat. And there are prominent yakkhas living there who have no faith in the word of the Blessed Lord. In order to give these folk confidence, may the Blessed Lord learn by means of which monks and nuns, male and female lay-followers may dwell guarded, protected, unharmed and at their ease?’

AN 8.29 about wandering / travelling:

(5) "Again, a Tathāgata has arisen in the world … and the Dhamma leading to peace, nibbāna, and enlightenment is taught as proclaimed by a Fortunate One. But a person has been reborn in the outlying provinces among the uncouth foreigners, [a place] to which bhikkhus, bhikkhunīs, male lay followers, and female lay followers do not travel. This is the fifth inopportune moment that is not the right occasion for living the spiritual life.

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This is about female wanderers of other sects. There are a few mentions of non-Buddhist samanis in the EBTs, thus confirming that female asceticism was not uncommon at that time.
For me, this is also an indication that the Buddha was always planning to have a bhikkhuni sangha. After all, these women ascetics were already around. They would just come and listen to his teachings, just as the male ascetics, and since his teachings are so beautiful and convincing, how could they not become his followers? The Buddha didn’t really have a choice! :stuck_out_tongue:

Especially beautiful is the sutta with the very self-confident Samani Sucimukhi (“needle-mouth”), who challenges Sariputta at SN 28.10.
Here are the other instances where female ascetics are mentioned:
MN 45 simile of a female wanderer’s soft arm
MN 56 Upali closes his house to the Niganthas and Niganthis
AN 6.57 Female Ajivakas of Purana Kassapa
Ud 4.8 Samani Sundari is killed
Ud 2.6 The pregnant wife of a wanderer needs oil

Also, there are of course Vens. Bhadda Kapilani and Bhadda Kundalakesa, who were non-Buddhist ascetics before their conversion. They have their verses at Thig 107 (B. Kundalakesa) and Thig 65f (Bhadda Kapilani)

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Inspiring upasikas

There were many very accomplished upasikas at the Buddha’s time.
AN 2.133 and AN4.176 about role models for upasikas:

“Bhikkhus, a female lay follower endowed with faith, rightly aspiring, should aspire thus: ‘May I become like the female lay followers Khujjuttarā and Veḷukaṇṭakī Nandamātā!’ This is the standard and criterion for my female lay disciples, that is, the female lay followers Khujjuttarā and Veḷukaṇṭakī Nandamātā.”

More suttas on Nandamata: AN 6.37 (her offerings) and AN 7.35 (her amazing qualities)

AN 5.64

“Bhikkhus, growing in five ways, a female noble disciple grows by a noble growth, and she absorbs the essence and the best of this life. What five? She grows in faith, virtuous behavior, learning, generosity, and wisdom. Growing in these five ways, a female noble disciple grows by a noble growth, and she absorbs the essence and the best of this life.”
She who grows in faith and virtuous behavior,
in wisdom, generosity, and learning—
such a virtuous female lay follower
absorbs for herself the essence of this life.

Quite often, it was the wifes who introduced their husbands to Buddhism and their devotion and wisdom kept their husbands and families on the right track. Some examples:

Queen Mallika teaches king Pasenadi about attachment to loved ones at MN87, before he was a Buddhist upasaka.

Nakulamata at AN 6.16

Now on that occasion the householder Nakulapitā was sick, afflicted, gravely ill. Then the housewife Nakulamātā said this to him: “Do not die full of concern, householder. To die full of concern is painful. To die full of concern has been criticized by the Blessed One.
(6) “It may be, householder, that you think thus: ‘Nakulamātā has not attained a foothold, a firm stand, assurance in this Dhamma and discipline; she has not crossed over doubt, gotten rid of bewilderment, attained self-confidence, and become independent of others in the Teacher’s teaching.’ But you should not look at the matter in this way. I am one of the Blessed One’s white-robed female lay disciples who have attained a foothold, … and become independent of others in the Teacher’s teaching. If anyone has any doubt or uncertainty about this, …
Then, while the householder Nakulapitā was being exhorted in this way by the housewife Nakulamātā, his ailment subsided on the spot. Nakulapitā recovered from that illness, and that is how his illness was abandoned.

A brahmin with a new wife without faith also looses faith:
MN 97

(Sāriputta:) “Friend, there is a brahmin named Dhānañjāni living at the Taṇḍulapāla Gate. Is that brahmin Dhānañjāni well and strong?” “That brahmin Dhānañjāni too is well and strong, friend.”
“Is he diligent, friend?” “How could he be diligent, friend? He plunders brahmin householders in the name of the king, and he plunders the king in the name of the brahmin householders. His wife, who had faith and came from a clan with faith, has died and he has taken another wife, a woman without faith who comes from a clan without faith.” “This is bad news that we hear, friend. It is bad news indeed to hear that the brahmin Dhānañjāni has become negligent.

A brahmin woman converts a brahmin student to Buddhism at MN 100. A woman of the same name converts her husband at SN 7.1 who then goes forth and becomes an arahant.
Prince Bodhi’s mother makes him go for refuge already when he is still in her womb at MN 85!
At SN 10.5, a mother encourages her son who is a bhikkhu and wants to disrobe, to keep living the holy life.
[Visakha apparently also converted her in-laws to Buddhism, but afaik that is a commentarial story.]

Upasikas chanting / quoting Dhamma and discussing deep dhamma questions, such as Nandamata at AN 7.35, and Kali:
AN 10.26

On one occasion the Venerable Mahākaccāna was dwelling among the people of Avantī on Mount Pavatta at Kuraraghara. Then the female lay follower Kāḷī of Kuraraghara approached him, paid homage to him, sat down to one side, and said to him: “Bhante, this was said by the Blessed One in ‘The Maidens’ Questions’:
“‘Having conquered the army of the pleasant and agreeable,
meditating alone, I discovered bliss,
the attainment of the goal, the peace of the heart.
Therefore I don’t form intimate ties with people,
nor does intimacy with anyone get a chance with me.’
“How, Bhante, is the meaning of this statement that the Blessed One spoke in brief to be seen in detail?”
“Some ascetics and brahmins, sister, for whom the attainment of the earth kasiṇa is supreme, generated it as their goal. The Blessed One directly knew to what extent the attainment of the earth kasiṇa is supreme. …

Various princesses asking questions of the Buddha: AN 5.31 Princess Sumana, AN 5.32 Princess Cundi

AN 1.258 ff contains an inspiring list of the foremost female lay disciples. Apparently, in the Chinese parallels, these lists are even much longer. So there’s a good reason to learn Chinese! :wink:

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Inspiring and independent women in the EBTs

Often we get the impression that women were completely dependent on men in India at that time. Here I’d like to share some quotes that show independent women in positions of authority.

Visakha has a matter to settle with king Pasenadi:
Ud 2.9

And on that occasion, Visākhā, Migāra’s mother, had some dealings with King Pasenadi Kosala that he did not settle as she had wished. So in the middle of the day she went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As she was sitting there the Blessed One said to her, “Well now, Visākhā, where are you coming from in the middle of the day?”
“Just now, lord, I had some dealings with King Pasenadi Kosala that he did not settle as I had wished.”

Addhakasi’s financial independence and wealth, Thig verse 25

My wages of prostitution were as large
as the revenue of the country of Kāsī;
the townspeople fixed that price
and made me priceless in price.

Brahmin lady with male student:
SN 35.133

On one occasion the Venerable Udāyī was living at Kāmaṇḍā in the brahmin Todeyya’s Mango Grove. Then a brahmin youth, a student of the brahmin lady of the Verahaccāni clan, approached the Venerable Udāyī and greeted him.

“See now, madam, you should know that the ascetic Udāyī teaches a Dhamma that is good in the beginning, good in the middle, and good in the end, with the right meaning and phrasing; he reveals a holy life that is perfectly complete and pure.”
“In that case, young man, invite the ascetic Udāyī in my name for tomorrow’s meal.”
“Yes, madam,” the youth replied. Then he went to the Venerable Udāyī and said to him: “Let Master Udāyī consent to accept tomorrow’s meal from our revered teacher, the brahmin lady of the Verahaccāni clan.”

Female heads of families
AN 4.258

“Bhikkhus, whatever families do not last long after attaining abundance of wealth, all do not last long for four reasons, or a particular one among them. What four? (1) They do not seek what has been lost; (2) they do not repair what has become decrepit; (3) they overindulge in eating and drinking; or (4) they appoint an immoral woman or man to be their chief. Whatever families do not last long after attaining abundance of wealth, all do not last long for these four reasons, or a particular one among them.
“Bhikkhus, whatever families last long after attaining abundance of wealth, all last long for four reasons, or a particular one among them. What four? (1) They seek what has been lost; (2) they repair what has become decrepit; (3) they are moderate in eating and drinking; and (4) they appoint a virtuous woman or man to be their chief. Whatever families last long after attaining abundance of wealth, all last long for these four reasons, or a particular one among them.”

And finally, a funny little story where two sisters send king Pasenadi as their messenger to the Buddha at MN 90

Then, when he had finished his breakfast, King Pasenadi of Kosala went to the Blessed One, and after paying homage to him, he sat down at one side and delivered the message of the sisters Somā and Sakulā.
“But, great king, could the sisters Somā and Sakulā find no other messenger?”
“Venerable sir, the sisters Somā and Sakulā heard: ‘Today King Pasenadi of Kosala will go to see the Blessed One after he has had his breakfast.’
Then, while the meal was being served, the sisters Somā and Sakulā came to me and said: ‘Sire, pay homage in our names with your head at the Blessed One’s feet, and ask whether he is free from illness…and abiding in comfort.’”
“May the sisters Somā and Sakulā be happy, great king.”

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I’ll finish with the Buddha using a woman metaphor to describe his foremost disciples:
MN 141

Sāriputta is like a mother; Moggallāna is like a nurse.

:wink:

There’s lots more, but these are the sutta quotes that I love most. Please share the suttas that inspire you, too!

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These are wonderful! Thank you!

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SĀDHU x 3000! Ayya @vimalanyani. This is wonderful.

As I said in our earlier conversation, I had collected some of the instances which would be the opposite of the above, where women were depicted somewhat negatively. The first observation I have is that my list is tiny whereas yours is huge. Secondly, most of the negative remarks in my list are circumstantial and open to interpretation, whereas the positive remarks in yours are absolute.

I think this settles the matter for good! Not only is it inconceivable that a fully enlightened being could be prejudiced in his mind in any way, against women or otherwise, but there’s nothing in the text, that was passed down to us, which describes the teachings of Buddha and life of both monks and nuns who lived around him - there is nothing in that text which could make us admit any discrimination against women today, or even condone or tolerate it. Rather it is only the opposite that the text so evidently proves!

This was once, and still is, a wonderful Dhamma and spiritual doctrine! And as it was corrupted and contaminated even on the level of core-teachings, its natural and expected emphasis on gender-equality was likewise affected negatively by the social mundane cultures which came to adopt “Buddhism” as a social religion later in history.

I think as honest and sincere monastics, whose devotion is to pursue the Sublime Path taught by Buddha and nothing else, our duty is to show and clarify these matters so long as we live and so long as that devotion of ours lasts.

That’s why I think that the effort that you’ve put in this collection is indeed worthwhile and praiseworthy in ways which deserve in response much more than the sum of “likes” that you’ll earn for these posts here. So I really don’t think this is just another topic on the forum, I think this is important and purposeful in ways which could have far reaching effects, especially on those women who, though could be so highly endowed with spiritual capacities, yet don’t know about the splendor of this Dhamma or think that “all religions are the same!”

Therefore I propose that this collection be made into a “publication”, like a booklet, an inviting one, short and simple, to be released, as a flicker of light, in this world that plunges even deeper and deeper in the deadly darkness of prejudice.

:anjal:

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Best. Thread. Ever.

Seconded!

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Thanks for your comments, venerables! :grin:

I always wonder, these people who use the negative passages to justify discrimination, are they aware that there are negative comments about men, too? Maybe we should show them my collection of “evil men” suttas. :stuck_out_tongue:

:sweat_smile:
Sure, would be nice to share it with more people. But I don’t actually know how to go about it if I wanted to make a booklet.
Like a pdf for download? What about copyright? These aren’t my translations…

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Bhante @Sujato: can we convince you to make an English translation of the Therigatha? It’s so disappointing that we have nothing on SC! :anjal:

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No trouble in republishing “excerpts” from a copyrighted work, though there would be much wisdom in relying on the translations of someone who is friendly to the cause and who will not object to … Actually, whatever!!

Plus, judging by his incomparable generosity, I think venerable @sujato would be happy to offer fresh translations of your final selections if he got the time. Already the language of some of the stuff you quoted in here sounds pretty weird, although the original text is rarely weird! So it will be good to have these things represented in a more familiar, not alienating language.

I’d think that for now, the task is to prepare the best possible selection of text and make the best choices that will bring a sense of comprehensiveness and completeness to the final booklet; an inviting and inspiring product, in which even the heathen and godless would find much merit! A product that is like one of those tiny emulates which dispel many great evil and negativity, a ‘mangalaṃ’ so to speak!

And this could be a group effort if you prefer, like asking the many excellent and admirable women participants in here about which text they think should be prioritised, and so forth.

Fun time! :balloon:

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:grin:
They are not yet proofread. But I guess we are not in a hurry.
Also, they don’t cover the EBTs from the Khuddaka Nikaya, and I have quite a number of quotes from there.
Maybe Bhante @Sujato can be convinced to translate them, too? I think a lot of people would be interested and grateful for that! :anjal:

:sweat_smile: Raising the bar here… I’ll see what I can do…

Lets start by inviting people to post their favourite sutta quotes here and making suggestions.

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Dear Ayya,

What a truly, truly wonderful topic. Thank you so much for all this wonderful work.

I tried starting something similar but it was no where near as excellent as this as I didn’t do the amazing, and time consuming, work that you have clearly done. I am so happy you’ve done this! Anumodana!

With metta :pray:t6::heartpulse:

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Thank you so much for doing all this work, Ayya! It’s so inspiring! :tulip:

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Thank you all for your kind words! :sparkling_heart:
There is an idea to make a booklet, so please post your favourite quotes, comments and contributions here!

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