Is Buddha's teaching not for every one?

If yes what about the gradual training?

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“This Dhamma is for one who is modest, not for one who is self-aggrandizing. This Dhamma is for one who is content, not for one who is discontent. This Dhamma is for one who is reclusive, not for one who is entangled. This Dhamma is for one whose persistence is aroused, not for one who is lazy. This Dhamma is for one whose mindfulness is established, not for one whose mindfulness is confused. This Dhamma is for one whose mind is centered, not for one whose mind is uncentered. This Dhamma is for one endowed with discernment, not for whose discernment is weak.”

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an08/an08.030.than.html

Correct, the Buddha’s teaching is not for everyone. I believe you answered it in your post above.

Anuruddha Mahāvitakka Suttaṃ

1. This Dhamma is for one who wants little, not for one who wants much (appicchassāyaṃ dhammo, nāyaṃ dhammo mahicchassa).
2. This Dhamma is for the contented, not for the discontented (santuṭṭhassāyaṃ dhammo, nāyaṃ dhammo asantuṭṭhassa).
3. This Dhamma is for the reclusive, not for one fond of society (pavivittassāyaṃ dhammo, nāyaṃ dhammo saṅgaṇikārāmassa).
4. This Dhamma is for the energetic, not for the lazy (āraddhavīriyassāyaṃ dhammo, nāyaṃ dhammo kusītassa).
5. This Dhamma is for one with well-established mindfulness, not for one of confused mindfulness (upaṭṭhitassatissāyaṃ dhammo, nāyaṃ dhammo muṭṭhassatissa).
6. This Dhamma is for the composed, not for the uncomposed (samāhitassāyaṃ dhammo, nāyaṃ dhammo asamāhitassa).
7. This Dhamma is for the wise, not for the unwise (paññavato ayaṃ dhammo, nāyaṃ dhammo duppaññassa).
8. This Dhamma is for one who is free from impediments, not for one who delights in impediments (nippapañcārāmassāyaṃ dhammo nippapañcaratino, nāyaṃ dhammo papañcārāmassa papañcaratino).

It can still be considered gradual, because one could come to the Dhamma when one is ready, when one is content, not discontented, when one is energetic, not lazy; etc.

:anjal:

So, Buddha Dhamma is not for the hunters in Alaska?

Don’t know how you got to that conclusion!

As per AN3.80, it could be said that the the hunters from Alaska are individuals who at least see as desirable and commited to wanting little, being contented, reclusive, energetic, mindful, composed, wise, free from impediments, then Dhamma is for them! :slight_smile:

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What I am saying is Eskimo’s have to make a living only from killing.

I still don’t follow… :confused:

When saying the Buddha’s teachings are not for everyone, I think it’s better to keep that at the individual level, rather than referring to whole groups of people, ethnicities, etc. Not all Eskimos make their living from killing / hunting. In this year of 2017 I think it is quite rare actually. For example, a member of the Eskimo community might move to San Francisco and then find out about Spirit Rock (the nearby retreat center) and attend some programs there.

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Sorry to confused you.
What I am trying to say is that there are many Buddhist who do not fall in to this classification.
The Buddhism can be practiced in a lower level too.

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Well he is certainly not gona be staying at the Susan Kershner center at $700 - $1750/night for a simple 2 room apartment https://www.spiritrock.org/off-site-accommodations
But hopefully he might find something in the 1000$ per week range

Buddhism is not the cheapest of religions : D

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Okay, then there is always Abhyagiri not too far away, offered just on voluntary dana, I believe. :grin:

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But maybe he doesn’t wana be seen there with all the bad people and make the eskimo community get a bad image :))

If the sutta number (eg. AN 8.30) is typed in, as a courtesy, it can be clicked on by readers here.

I have read in MN 117 there appear to be two types of Buddha’s teachings, namely, mundane & supramundane. AN 8.30 appears to be for bhikkhus & bhikkhunis therefore AN 8.30 may not exactly answer the question.

[quote=“DhammaWiki, post:2, topic:5504”]

  1. This Dhamma is for one who wants little, not for one who wants much (appicchassāyaṃ dhammo, nāyaṃ dhammo mahicchassa).

  2. This Dhamma is for the contented, not for the discontented (santuṭṭhassāyaṃ dhammo, nāyaṃ dhammo asantuṭṭhassa).

It can still be considered gradual, because one could come to the Dhamma when one is ready, when one is content, not discontented, when one is energetic, not lazy; etc.[/quote]

Many people have a lot, which is generally indicative of an underlying tendency (anusaya) of wanting a lot. Due to having a lot, they find contentment (for example, not having to worry about money due to renting real estate for $700 - $1750/night).

When people are contented from having (their wants fulfilled), it appears, based on AN 8.30, the Buddha’s teaching is not for them.

But then AN 4.62 appears to say the contrary, as follows:

There are these four kinds of bliss that can be attained in the proper season, on the proper occasions, by a householder partaking of sensuality. Which four? The bliss of having, the bliss of [making use of] wealth, the bliss of debtlessness, the bliss of blamelessness.

:penguin:

When I first took an interest in Dhamma, I was actually extremely discontented. Due to my discontentment, I aroused great energy to practise. Obviously, there is something amiss in AN 8.30 to answer this topic question sufficiently if the teachings are not for the discontented.

Why would killing for food to provide for their family & community exclude an eskimo from the Buddha’s teachings? Surely, an eskimo suffers from sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief & despair he/she may want to overcome.

AN 9.5 calls the benevolence of the teachings a ‘gift’; thus states the teachings are available for free.

And my mama cried
Nanook, a-no-no
Don’t be a naughty Eskimo
Save your money, don’t go to the show
And she said, with a tear in her eye
Watch out where the huskies go and don’t you eat that yellow snow

Acharya Frank Zappa

:penguin:

AN 8.30 is obviously for monks & is probably not the appropriate sutta to answer this question.

SN 56.47 is probably a better sutta. Or SN 6.1. I trust there are many more suttas that clarify for whom the teaching is for.

Sooner, I say, would that blind turtle, coming to the surface once every hundred years, insert its neck into that yoke with a single hole than the fool who has gone once to the nether world would regain the human state. For what reason? Because here, bhikkhus, there is no conduct guided by the Dhamma, no righteous conduct, no wholesome activity, no meritorious activity. Here there prevails mutual devouring, the devouring of the weak.

As he did so, he saw beings with little dust in their eyes… with keen faculties… with good attributes… easy to teach… seeing disgrace and danger in the other world (paraloka).

:koala:

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I would personally look at the end of AN8.30 to support @Deeele when he state that this is probably not an appropriate sutta:

It would appear to me that the 8 statements relate to one’s behaviour, in which case “This Dhamma is for one” is more about one’s achievement than about one’s starting point.

Which doesn’t answer the OP question. To which I would answer bold “Yes”. It is for everyone, but not just at the same time(like right now). The cause and conditions for one to follow the Buddha’s teaching have to be in place.

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I’m sure you can find a nice guy who hunts for living. But there is a limit on much he can progress without giving up killing.

I can ask you back a question:

Can a womanizer be a good husband?

He can certainly take care of the family, but how much good can he be without giving up his bad habit?

You can’t compare sexual appetite for the hunger.

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What I meant was sexual appetite is easier to suppress than the hunger.

I mean he has to change his lifestyle for the teaching, not the other way around.

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