SuttaCentral

Suttas against 'no self' and 'no soul'

no-self
no-soul
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#61

Yes, of course, but I think you miss my point.


#62

You might be correct.


#63

Here’s a nice one actually:

This supreme Brahmā vehicle [the 8fold Path] arises in oneself.
Etadattani sambhūtaṃ, brahmayānaṃ anuttaraṃ

I guess a viable (creative!) translation could be
“This supreme vehicle of Brahman arises in the atman

While you can take ‘atman’ with a wink, the translation should really be ‘Brahman’, and not ‘Brahmā’ because not the deity is meant here.


#64

“This supreme Brahmā vehicle arises in oneself”

It is just as if a woman or a man—young, youthful, and fond of ornaments—would look at her or his own facial reflection in a clean bright mirror or in a bowl of clear water. If they see any dust or blemish there, they will make an effort to remove it. But if they do not see any dust or blemish there, they will be glad about it; and their wish fulfilled, they will think, ‘How fortunate that I’m clean!’ So too, self-examination is very helpful for a bhikkhu to grow in wholesome qualities.

“One should ask oneself: (1) ‘Am I often given to longing or without longing? (2) Am I often given to ill will or without ill will? (3) Am I often overcome by dullness and drowsiness or free from dullness and drowsiness? (4) Am I often restless or calm? (5) Am I often plagued by doubt or free from doubt? (6) Am I often angry or without anger? (7) Is my mind often defiled or undefiled? (8) Is my body often agitated or unagitated? (9) Am I often lazy or energetic? (10) Am I often unconcentrated or concentrated?’

“If, by such self-examination, a bhikkhu knows: ‘I am often given to longing, given to ill will, overcome by dullness and drowsiness, restless, plagued by doubt, angry, defiled in mind, agitated in body, lazy, and unconcentrated,’ he should put forth extraordinary desire, effort, zeal, enthusiasm, indefatigability, mindfulness, and clear comprehension to abandon those same bad unwholesome qualities. Just as one whose clothes or head had caught fire would put forth extraordinary desire, effort, zeal, enthusiasm, indefatigability, mindfulness, and clear comprehension to extinguish the fire on his clothes or head, so too that bhikkhu should put forth extraordinary desire, effort, zeal, enthusiasm, indefatigability, mindfulness, and clear comprehension to abandon those same bad unwholesome qualities.


#65

Are we to assume that in order for Buddhism to be authentic enough to be taken seriously as an original doctrine that the language used to convey it must be newly coined and without-prescient, otherwise it is automatically questionable in validity? Having to explain new vocabulary/terminology to audiences every other third paragraph would be so handicapping as to make the transmission wading through a bog waist deep. Absurd.

If you are looking for disunity in reading the suttas you tend to find it readily as well. And there in-lies the fundamental flaw in all scholastic “critical studies” disciplines. There is merit in critical studies, but all too often it derails into absurd reductionism, oversimplifications, and unfounded assumptions of interpretation presented as authoritative.

In the thousands of suttas I have ingested, the overwhelming majority of them have only furthered my personal practice.

To each their own. Guess I must be a fool…
:anjal: