SuttaCentral

What is the difference between neutral feeling and equanimity?


#21

Great dhamm sermon by Ajahn Punnadhammo in relation to equanimity.


#22

The above video is based on Visuddhimagga.
P152

Equanimity is of ten kinds; six-factored equanimity, equanimity as a divine
abiding, equanimity as an enlightenment factor, equanimity of energy,
equanimity about formations, equanimity as a feeling, equanimity about insight,
equanimity as specific neutrality, equanimity of jhána and equanimity of
purification


#23

Equanimity of unknowing:
“When one of deluded temperament sees any sort of visible object, he copies what others do, if he hears others criticizing, he criticizes, if he hears others praising, he praises; but actually he feels equanimity in himself- the equanimity of unknowing.”— Vism. III, 94


#24

Beautifully poetic…


#25

@SarathW1 I think this “near enemy” “far enemy” business is one of the few instances where the Abhidhamma (canonical or post-canonical?) sheds light instead of obfuscating.


#26

I found this quote which I think sums up the difference between spiritual and worldly upekkhā:

“Equanimity or equipoise, upek(k)hā, from an etymological perspective suggests a mental attitude of “looking upon”, not an indifferent “looking away”.”

-Bhikkhu Anālayo , “Compassion and Emptiness in Early Buddhist Meditation”

So it is not a feeling; it is an attitude. Of course, you can relate it to neutral feeling as much as positive and negative feelings can be related to their relative spiritual/worldly mental factors.


#27

According to Abhidhamma it is a feeling and a beautiful mental state.

https://accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/mendis/wheel322.html