What sutta expands the 5 hindrances to 7?

Hey folks,

I remember a talk by Ajahn Brahm where he referred to a place in the suttas where the 5 hindrances become 7, with the sixth being discontent. Does anyone know the reference?

Thanks. :slight_smile:

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The two extra hindrances, ignorance and discontent, are found in several chapters of the Paṭisambhidāmagga, but nowhere in the first four Nikāyas as far as I know.

With how many dhammas does virtue (sīla) combine?

[…]

Through renunciation in the case of desire for sense-pleasure virtue is in the sense of its restraint, virtue is in the sense of its non-transgression.
Through non-ill-will in the case of ill-will virtue is in the sense of its restraint, virtue is in the sense of its non-transgression.
Through perception of light in the case of sloth and torpor virtue is in the sense of its restraint, virtue is in the sense of its non-transgression.
Through non-distraction in the case of restlessness virtue is in the sense of its restraint, virtue is in the sense of its non-transgression.
Through defining of dhammas in the case of doubt virtue is in the sense of its restraint, virtue is in the sense of its non-transgression.
Through knowledge in the case of ignorance virtue is in the sense of its restraint, virtue is in the sense of its non-transgression.
Through gladness in the case of discontent virtue is in the sense of its restraint, virtue is in the sense of its non-transgression.

[…]

How is it that understanding of the termination of occurrence in one who is fully aware is knowledge of extinguishment?

Here one who is fully aware terminates through renunciation the occurrence of desire for sense-pleasure, he terminates through non-ill-will the occurrence of ill-will, he terminates through perception of light the occurrence of sloth and torpor, he terminates through non-distraction the occurrence of restlessness, he terminates through defining of dhammas the occurrence of doubt, he terminates through knowledge the occurrence of ignorance, he terminates through gladness the occurrence of discontent.

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Bhante,
Why discontent a hindrance? (discontent of what?)

How these extra two factors (ignorance and discontent) eliminated by meditation?

I find the talk you seem to mention -


Ajahn Brahm seems to mention it like “we might call these the sixth and seventh hindrances” without actually saying they are, I guess? :slightly_smiling_face:

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Nice work! I wasn’t aware of these transcribed talks. I arrived at Bodhinyana in 2006 and must have found a copy in the library way back then.

OK, good to know. Thanks for your help. :smile:

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I just had a chat to Ajahn Brahmali in the office today. He came up with another sutta: MN68. Here the five hindrances have discontent and weariness added. I’m pretty sure this is what Ajahn Brahm is talking about.

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There’s also the Pariyāyasutta which doubles the five to ten, according to whether they arise on account of the internal or the external, SN46.52, and the Abhidhamma’s Dhammasaṅgaṇī, which increase them to six by the addition of avijjā, Ds2.3.2.

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Bhante @Dhammanando can you give some example or details about what it means by discontent?

Arati is discontent (some translate it ‘boredom’ or ‘dissatisfaction’) with lonely lodgings — both in the literal sense of being unable to bear solitude and the figurative sense of not finding satisfaction in the three higher trainings (i.e., in adhisīla, adhicitta and adhipaññā)

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