Where does the Buddha say you need to able to feel to attain Nibbana?

Which is the sutta you once wrote where Buddha said you need to able to feel to attain Nibbana.

Thank you very much
Much Metta

@Brahmali a question for you …

@Upasaka_Dhammasara I have tagged bhante for you.

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For those who feel, I teach the Four Noble Truths… (AN 3.61)

I feel a feeling terminating with the body; all that is felt; not being relished/delighted in; will become cold right there… (MN 140; Iti 44)

By not clinging to what is felt, one personally attains Nibbana.… (MN 37)

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Unbinding defined as the pleasantness of release from suffering:

I have heard that on one occasion Ven. Sariputta was staying near Rajagaha in the Bamboo Grove, the Squirrels’ Feeding Sanctuary. There he said to the monks, “This Unbinding is pleasant, friends. This Unbinding is pleasant.”

When this was said, Ven. Udayin said to Ven. Sariputta, “But what is the pleasure here, my friend, where there is nothing felt?”

"Just that is the pleasure here, my friend: where there is nothing felt. There are these five strings of sensuality. Which five? Forms cognizable via the eye — agreeable, pleasing, charming, endearing, fostering desire, enticing; sounds cognizable via the ear… smells cognizable via the nose… tastes cognizable via the tongue… tactile sensations cognizable via the body — agreeable, pleasing, charming, endearing, fostering desire, enticing. Whatever pleasure or joy arises in dependence on these five strings of sensuality, that is sensual pleasure.

“Now there is the case where a monk — quite withdrawn from sensuality, withdrawn from unskillful qualities — enters & remains in the first jhana: rapture & pleasure born from withdrawal, accompanied by directed thought & evaluation. If, as he remains there, he is beset with attention to perceptions dealing with sensuality, that is an affliction for him. Just as pain arises as an affliction in a healthy person for his affliction, even so the attention to perceptions dealing with sensuality that beset the monk is an affliction for him. Now, the Blessed One has said that whatever is an affliction is stress. So by this line of reasoning it may be known how Unbinding is pleasant.”—Anguttara Nikaya 9.34

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I totally understand. Wonderful. :pray:

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Thanks my friend. Always helpful

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