10 kasinas. EBT or not?

In SN 46, bojjhanga samyutta, there are 20 suttas that take 20 meditation topics (most are also part of Vimt. and Vism’s 40 meditation topics):

quick description of the 20: first 5 are stages of corpses, then 4bv, and then 16 APS (anapana), followed by 10 perceptions starting with 31 body parts.

Each of the 20 meditation topics are put through 7sb (awakening factors), to show how each topic can take you into samadhi jhana, leading to nirvana.

Noticably absent are 10 kasinas.

VII. IN-AND-OUT BREATHING

• 57. The Skeleton • 58. The Worm-Infested • 59. The Livid • 60. The Fissured • 61. The Bloated • 62. Lovingkindness • 63. Compassion • 64. Altruistic Joy • 65. Equanimity • 66. Breathing
VIII. CESSATION

• 67. Foulness • 68. Death • 69. Repulsiveness of Food • 70. Nondelight • 71. Impermanence • 72. Suffering • 73. Nonself • 74. Abandonment • 75. Dispassion • 76. Cessation

1 Like

In AN 1, 10 kasinas are part of a larger list of meditation subjects.
It totals up to about 40, but looks like it’s missing 4bv (brahma vihara) and substituted with something else, compared with Vimt. and Vism.

(standard formula for attaining 4 arupa attainments)

:diamonds: 435-442. rūpī rūpāni passati… ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati subhanteva adhimutto hoti… sabbaso rūpasaññānaṃ samatikkamā paṭighasaññānaṃ atthaṅgamā nānattasaññānaṃ amanasikārā ananto ākāsoti ākāsānañcāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati… sabbaso ākāsānañcāyatanaṃ samatikkamma anantaṃ viññāṇanti viññāṇañcāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati… sabbaso viññāṇañcāyatanaṃ samatikkamma natthi kiñcīti ākiñcaññāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati… sabbaso ākiñcaññāyatanaṃ samatikkamma nevasaññānāsaññāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati… sabbaso nevasaññānāsaññāyatanaṃ samatikkamma saññāvedayitanirodhaṃ upasampajja viharati…

10 kasinas

:diamonds: 443-452. pathavīkasiṇaṃ bhāveti… āpokasiṇaṃ bhāveti… tejokasiṇaṃ bhāveti… vāyokasiṇaṃ bhāveti… nīlakasiṇaṃ bhāveti… pītakasiṇaṃ bhāveti… lohitakasiṇaṃ bhāveti… odātakasiṇaṃ bhāveti… ākāsakasiṇaṃ bhāveti… viññāṇakasiṇaṃ bhāveti…

(same 10 perceptions as in SN 46 #67-76)

:diamonds: 453-462. asubhasaññaṃ bhāveti…
maraṇasaññaṃ bhāveti…
āhāre paṭikūlasaññaṃ bhāveti…
sabbaloke anabhiratisaññaṃ VAR bhāveti…
aniccasaññaṃ bhāveti…
anicce dukkhasaññaṃ bhāveti…
dukkhe anattasaññaṃ bhāveti…
pahānasaññaṃ bhāveti…
virāgasaññaṃ bhāveti…
nirodhasaññaṃ bhāveti…

(5 of these are corpse stages from SN 46.57 through 61)

:diamonds: 463-472. aniccasaññaṃ bhāveti… anattasaññaṃ bhāveti… maraṇasaññaṃ bhāveti… āhāre paṭikūlasaññaṃ bhāveti… sabbaloke anabhiratisaññaṃ bhāveti… aṭṭhikasaññaṃ bhāveti… puḷavakasaññaṃ VAR bhāveti… vinīlakasaññaṃ bhāveti… vicchiddakasaññaṃ bhāveti… uddhumātakasaññaṃ bhāveti…

:diamonds: 473-482. buddhānussatiṃ bhāveti… dhammānussatiṃ bhāveti… saṅghānussatiṃ bhāveti… sīlānussatiṃ bhāveti… cāgānussatiṃ bhāveti… devatānussatiṃ bhāveti… ānāpānassatiṃ bhāveti… maraṇassatiṃ bhāveti… kāyagatāsatiṃ bhāveti… upasamānussatiṃ bhāveti…

the rest are permutations of above

:diamonds: 483-492. paṭhamajjhānasahagataṃ saddhindriyaṃ bhāveti… vīriyindriyaṃ bhāveti… satindriyaṃ bhāveti… samādhindriyaṃ bhāveti… paññindriyaṃ bhāveti… saddhābalaṃ bhāveti… vīriyabalaṃ bhāveti… satibalaṃ bhāveti… samādhibalaṃ bhāveti… paññābalaṃ bhāveti…

:diamonds: 493-562. “dutiyajjhānasahagataṃ … pe … tatiyajjhānasahagataṃ … pe … catutthajjhānasahagataṃ … pe … mettāsahagataṃ … pe … karuṇāsahagataṃ … pe … muditāsahagataṃ … pe … upekkhāsahagataṃ saddhindriyaṃ bhāveti… vīriyindriyaṃ bhāveti… satindriyaṃ bhāveti… samādhindriyaṃ bhāveti… paññindriyaṃ bhāveti… saddhābalaṃ bhāveti… vīriyabalaṃ bhāveti… satibalaṃ bhāveti… samādhibalaṃ bhāveti… paññābalaṃ bhāveti. ayaṃ vuccati, bhikkhave — ‘bhikkhu arittajjhāno viharati satthusāsanakaro ovādapatikaro, amoghaṃ raṭṭhapiṇḍaṃ bhuñjati’. ko pana vādo ye naṃ bahulīkarontī”ti!

:diamonds: aparāccharāsaṅghātavaggo aṭṭhārasamo.

1 Like

The way I understand there is no limit to the object of meditation. You can have 400 or 40000 meditation object. Any object can be your meditation object. But what differ is the suitability. I use breath as my meditation object.

I’m putting together an anthology of EBT meditation suttas, and as of right now, 10 kasinas is not going to be in there. As of right now, I don’t consider it EBT, since you can’t even find any instructions on how to do that practice. It’s only mentioned in a few laundry lists as a list of names. Instead of 40 meditation subjects in Vism. and Vimt., an EBT anthology of meditation subjects will probably closer to the low 30’s.

Unless someone can provide some evidence to the contrary.

1 Like

As far as I know, in the EBT there are just 5 suttas directly related to 10 kasinas, all the other sutta references just seem to be cut and paste from those 5 suttas. Here are my notes. I would appreciate if anyone can supply quotes from any research that prove whether or not 10ksn is EBT or not.

After studying those 5 suttas carefully, at first it seems there isn’t any instruction on how to practice those 10ksn, but then again, if you look for instructions of the four formless attainments, those instructions are equally sparse.

Table of Contents

10ksn: 10 kasinas

Kasinas are probably not EBT.
They were most likely samatha meditation techniques from other brahmanical traditions, which later generations of Buddhists incorporated.
In the EBT, the only passages you can find on kasina are really sparse.
AN 10.25 gives the basic STED definition.
AN 10.26 adds a little more explanation,
AN 10.29 puts it in context with 8 vimokkha and 8 abhibh-ayatana
AN 8.65 abhibh-āyatana, the first and second bases are showing the difference between 4 jhānas samādhi, and kasina samatha practice. "Kasina" is not explicitly stated, but its implied with code words.
AN 8.66 vimokkha sutta, smuggles in kasina samatha practice with code words, in a list that consists mostly of 5 arupa STED formless attainments, (space-infinitiude-dimension...perceptions&feelings-cessation).
8 vmk and 8 abhibh are also likely non EBT devices, not original words of the buddha, smuggled in to incorporate kasinas into Theravada.
As far as I can tell, all the other EBT passsage references are just a cut and paste reference to those 3 AN 10 suttas.
.
.

STED 10ksn: kasiṇa (AN 10.25)

kasiṇa-suttaṃ n (AN 10.25)
AN 10.25 Kasiṇa-discourse
♦ 25. VAR “dasay-imāni, bhikkhave, kasiṇ'-āyatanāni.
"(there are) ten-(of)-these, ********* kasina-bases.
katamāni dasa?
which ten? [- 1995 , 1996 -]

(10 kasinas)

(10 kasiṇas: 1. pathavī 2. āpo 3. tejo 4. vāyo 5. nīla 6. pīta 7. lohita 8. odāta 9. ākāsā 10. viññāṇa)
(10 kasinas: 1. earth 2. water 3. fire 4. air 5. blue 6. yellow 7. red 8. white 9. space 10. consciousness)
1. pathavī-kasiṇam-eko sañjānāti
1. earth-kasina; -- one [person] perceives (it)
uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ
above, below, across,
a-dvayaṃ ap-pamāṇaṃ;
non-dual, measure-less.
2. āpo-kasiṇam-eko sañjānāti
2. water-kasina; -- one [person] perceives (it)
uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ
above, below, across,
a-dvayaṃ ap-pamāṇaṃ;
non-dual, measure-less.
3. tejo-kasiṇam-eko sañjānāti
3. fire-kasina; -- one [person] perceives (it)
uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ
above, below, across,
a-dvayaṃ ap-pamāṇaṃ;
non-dual, measure-less.
4. vāyo-kasiṇam-eko sañjānāti
4. air-kasina; -- one [person] perceives (it)
uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ
above, below, across,
a-dvayaṃ ap-pamāṇaṃ;
non-dual, measure-less.
5. nīla-kasiṇam-eko sañjānāti
5. blue-kasina; -- one [person] perceives (it)
uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ
above, below, across,
a-dvayaṃ ap-pamāṇaṃ;
non-dual, measure-less.
6. pīta-kasiṇam-eko sañjānāti
6. yellow-kasina; -- one [person] perceives (it)
uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ
above, below, across,
a-dvayaṃ ap-pamāṇaṃ;
non-dual, measure-less.
7. lohita-kasiṇam-eko sañjānāti
7. red-kasina; -- one [person] perceives (it)
uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ
above, below, across,
a-dvayaṃ ap-pamāṇaṃ;
non-dual, measure-less.
8. odāta-kasiṇam-eko sañjānāti
8. white-kasina; -- one [person] perceives (it)
uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ
above, below, across,
a-dvayaṃ ap-pamāṇaṃ;
non-dual, measure-less.
9. ākāsa-kasiṇam-eko sañjānāti
9. space-kasina; -- one [person] perceives (it)
uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ
above, below, across,
a-dvayaṃ ap-pamāṇaṃ;
non-dual, measure-less.
10. viññāṇa-kasiṇam-eko sañjānāti
10. consciousness-kasina; -- one [person] perceives (it)
uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ
above, below, across,
a-dvayaṃ ap-pamāṇaṃ;
non-dual, measure-less.
imāni kho, bhikkhave, dasa kasiṇ'-āyatanānī”ti.
these ***, *********, (are the) ten kasiṇa-bases.”
pañcamaṃ.
(end of sutta)

1995 bodhi footnote kasina

Kasiṇāyatanāni. The kasiṇas are disks representing elements or colors used as objects of samādhi meditation.
For example, the earth kasiṇa is a disk filled with reddish brown clay; the water kasiṇa is a bowl of water; the color kasiṇas are colored disks. Though the meditator begins with a physical disk, when he can see the kasiṇa clearly with his mind’s eye, he discards the physical disk and focuses solely on the mental image.
As concentration deepens, another image called the “counterpart mark” (paṭibhāganimitta) emerges as an anchor of attention.
Vism chaps. 4 and 5 offer a detailed explanation of the kasiṇas. In the Vism system, the space kasiṇa (which was originally the base of the infinity of space) is replaced by the limited-space kasiṇa, and the consciousness kasiṇa by the light kasiṇa.

1996 bodhi footnote "advaya" nondual

“Nondual” (advaya) here refers simply to the presentation of the object and not to an underlying ontological unity.
Mp explains: “This is said because one [kasiṇa] does not acquire the quality of another. For just as, when one enters the water, there is only water and nothing else in all directions, so too, the earth kasiṇa is only the earth kasiṇa. It is unmixed with any other kasiṇa. The same method applies to the others.”
On appamāṇa, “measureless,” Mp says: “This is stated by way of measureless pervasion of this or that [object]. For pervading it with the mind, one pervades the whole thing; one does not grasp boundaries, thinking: ‘This is its beginning, this is its middle.’”

AN 1: 10ksn part of 40 meditation subjects here

.
.
In AN 1, 10 kasinas are part of a larger list of meditation subjects.
It totals up to about 40, but looks like it’s missing 4bv (brahma vihara) and substituted with something else, compared with Vimt. and Vism.
(standard formula for attaining 4 arupa attainments)
:diamonds: 435-442. rūpī rūpāni passati… ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati subhanteva adhimutto hoti… sabbaso rūpasaññānaṃ samatikkamā paṭighasaññānaṃ atthaṅgamā nānattasaññānaṃ amanasikārā ananto ākāsoti ākāsānañcāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati… sabbaso ākāsānañcāyatanaṃ samatikkamma anantaṃ viññāṇanti viññāṇañcāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati… sabbaso viññāṇañcāyatanaṃ samatikkamma natthi kiñcīti ākiñcaññāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati… sabbaso ākiñcaññāyatanaṃ samatikkamma nevasaññānāsaññāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati… sabbaso nevasaññānāsaññāyatanaṃ samatikkamma saññāvedayitanirodhaṃ upasampajja viharati…
10 kasinas
:diamonds: 443-452. pathavīkasiṇaṃ bhāveti… āpokasiṇaṃ bhāveti… tejokasiṇaṃ bhāveti… vāyokasiṇaṃ bhāveti… nīlakasiṇaṃ bhāveti… pītakasiṇaṃ bhāveti… lohitakasiṇaṃ bhāveti… odātakasiṇaṃ bhāveti… ākāsakasiṇaṃ bhāveti… viññāṇakasiṇaṃ bhāveti…
(same 10 perceptions as in SN 46 #67-76)
:diamonds: 453-462. asubhasaññaṃ bhāveti…
maraṇasaññaṃ bhāveti…
āhāre paṭikūlasaññaṃ bhāveti…
sabbaloke anabhiratisaññaṃ VAR bhāveti…
aniccasaññaṃ bhāveti…
anicce dukkhasaññaṃ bhāveti…
dukkhe anattasaññaṃ bhāveti…
pahānasaññaṃ bhāveti…
virāgasaññaṃ bhāveti…
nirodhasaññaṃ bhāveti…
(5 of these are corpse stages from SN 46.57 through 61)
:diamonds: 463-472. aniccasaññaṃ bhāveti… anattasaññaṃ bhāveti… maraṇasaññaṃ bhāveti… āhāre paṭikūlasaññaṃ bhāveti… sabbaloke anabhiratisaññaṃ bhāveti… aṭṭhikasaññaṃ bhāveti… puḷavakasaññaṃ VAR bhāveti… vinīlakasaññaṃ bhāveti… vicchiddakasaññaṃ bhāveti… uddhumātakasaññaṃ bhāveti…
:diamonds: 473-482. buddhānussatiṃ bhāveti… dhammānussatiṃ bhāveti… saṅghānussatiṃ bhāveti… sīlānussatiṃ bhāveti… cāgānussatiṃ bhāveti… devatānussatiṃ bhāveti… ānāpānassatiṃ bhāveti… maraṇassatiṃ bhāveti… kāyagatāsatiṃ bhāveti… upasamānussatiṃ bhāveti…
the rest are permutations of above
:diamonds: 483-492. paṭhamajjhānasahagataṃ saddhindriyaṃ bhāveti… vīriyindriyaṃ bhāveti… satindriyaṃ bhāveti… samādhindriyaṃ bhāveti… paññindriyaṃ bhāveti… saddhābalaṃ bhāveti… vīriyabalaṃ bhāveti… satibalaṃ bhāveti… samādhibalaṃ bhāveti… paññābalaṃ bhāveti…
:diamonds: 493-562. “dutiyajjhānasahagataṃ … pe … tatiyajjhānasahagataṃ … pe … catutthajjhānasahagataṃ … pe … mettāsahagataṃ … pe … karuṇāsahagataṃ … pe … muditāsahagataṃ … pe … upekkhāsahagataṃ saddhindriyaṃ bhāveti… vīriyindriyaṃ bhāveti… satindriyaṃ bhāveti… samādhindriyaṃ bhāveti… paññindriyaṃ bhāveti… saddhābalaṃ bhāveti… vīriyabalaṃ bhāveti… satibalaṃ bhāveti… samādhibalaṃ bhāveti… paññābalaṃ bhāveti. ayaṃ vuccati, bhikkhave — ‘bhikkhu arittajjhāno viharati satthusāsanakaro ovādapatikaro, amoghaṃ raṭṭhapiṇḍaṃ bhuñjati’. ko pana vādo ye naṃ bahulīkarontī”ti!
:diamonds: aparāccharāsaṅghātavaggo aṭṭhārasamo.
https://discourse.suttacentral.net/t/10-kasinas-ebt-or-not/7565

SN 46 10ksn are noticably absent from 20 meditation subjects for jhana/samadhi

.
.
In SN 46, bojjhanga samyutta, there are 20 suttas that take 20 meditation topics (most are also part of Vimt. and Vism’s 40 meditation topics):
quick description of the 20: first 5 are stages of corpses, then 4bv, and then 16 APS (anapana), followed by 10 perceptions starting with 31 body parts.
Each of the 20 meditation topics are put through 7sb (awakening factors), to show how each topic can take you into samadhi jhana, leading to nirvana.
Noticably absent are 10 kasinas.
VII. IN-AND-OUT BREATHING
• 57. The Skeleton • 58. The Worm-Infested • 59. The Livid • 60. The Fissured • 61. The Bloated • 62. Lovingkindness • 63. Compassion • 64. Altruistic Joy • 65. Equanimity • 66. Breathing
VIII. CESSATION
• 67. Foulness • 68. Death • 69. Repulsiveness of Food • 70. Nondelight • 71. Impermanence • 72. Suffering • 73. Nonself • 74. Abandonment • 75. Dispassion • 76. Cessation

DhsA. 200: 16 APS and air kasina

This forgotten connection is still preserved in the Atthakatha:
"But is this all the absorption belonging to the consciousness of the sphere of refined form, beginning with the earth kasiṇa and ending in the perception of the skeleton? Or is there anything else?"
"Yes, there is. There is ānāpāna jhāna and the development of kāyagatāsati, which have not been spoken of here."
"Why not?"
"Because ānāpāna jhāna is included in the air kasiṇa; the development of kāyagatāsati arisen by virtue of the fourfold and fivefold jhānas with reference to the hair etc., is included in the colour kasiṇas; the kāyagatāsati produced by virtue of the jhānas attending to the unattractiveness in the thirty-two parts of the body, and that of the jhāna attending to the colours of the nine kinds of corpses in the charnel grounds is included in the ten repulsive things. Thus all the absorptions of consciousness connected with the sphere of refined form have been included here."
(DhsA. 200)

8 abhibh-āyatana

AN 8.65 abhibh-āyatana

abhibh-āyatana-suttaṃ (AN 8.65)
AN 8.65 Overcoming
♦ 65. “aṭṭhimāni, bhikkhave, abhibh-āyatanāni.
“(there are) eight-(of)-these, *********, overcoming-(of)-bases.
katamāni aṭṭha?
What eight?

(1. Perceives internal rupa, sees external rupa limited)

1. ajjhattaṃ rūpa-saññī eko bahiddhā rūpāni passati
(1) “internally form-percipent, *** externally form (he) sees,
parittāni suvaṇṇa-dubbaṇṇāni.
limited, beautiful-(or)-ugly.
‘tāni abhibhuyya jānāmi passāmī’ti, evaṃ-saññī hoti.
‘those (having been) overcome, I know, I see’, thus-(he is)-percipient.
idaṃ paṭhamaṃ abhibh'-āyatanaṃ.
This (is the) first overcoming-of-bases.

(2. Perceives internal rupa, sees external rupa measureless)

2. ♦ “ajjhattaṃ rūpa-saññī eko bahiddhā rūpāni passati
(2) “internally form-percipent, *** externally form (he) sees,
appamāṇāni suvaṇṇa-dubbaṇṇāni.
measureless, beautiful-or-ugly.
idaṃ dutiyaṃ abhibh'-āyatanaṃ.
This (is the) second overcoming-of-bases.

(3. Does not perceive internal rupa, sees external rupa limited)

3. ♦ “ajjhattaṃ a-rūpa-saññī eko bahiddhā rūpāni passati
(3) “internally not-form-percipent, *** externally form (he) sees,
parittāni suvaṇṇa-dubbaṇṇāni. ‘
limited, beautiful-or-ugly.
idaṃ tatiyaṃ abhibh-āyatanaṃ.
This (is the) third overcoming-of-bases.

(4. Does not perceive internal rupa, sees external rupa measureless)

4. ♦ “ajjhattaṃ a-rūpa-saññī eko bahiddhā rūpāni passati
(4) “internally not-form-percipent, *** externally form (he) sees,
appamāṇāni suvaṇṇa-dubbaṇṇāni.
measureless, beautiful-or-ugly.
idaṃ catutthaṃ abhibh'-āyatanaṃ.
This (is the) fourth overcoming-of-bases.

(5. Does not perceives internal rupa, sees external rupa blue color)

5. ♦ “ajjhattaṃ a-rūpa-saññī eko bahiddhā rūpāni passati
(5) “internally not-form-percipent, *** externally form (he) sees,
nīlāni nīlavaṇṇāni nīlanidassanāni nīlanibhāsāni.
blue ones, blue in color, with a blue hue, with a blue tint.
idaṃ pañcamaṃ abhibh'-āyatanaṃ.
This (is the) fifth overcoming-of-bases.

(6. Does not perceives internal rupa, sees external rupa yellow color)

6. ♦ “ajjhattaṃ a-rūpa-saññī eko bahiddhā rūpāni passati
(6) “internally not-form-percipent, *** externally form (he) sees,
pītāni pītavaṇṇāni pītanidassanāni pītanibhāsāni.
yellow ones, yellow in color, with a yellow hue, with a yellow tint.
idaṃ chaṭṭhaṃ abhibh'-āyatanaṃ.
This (is the) sixth overcoming-of-bases.

(7. Does not perceives internal rupa, sees external rupa red color)

7. ♦ “ajjhattaṃ a-rūpa-saññī eko bahiddhā rūpāni passati
(7) “internally not-form-percipent, *** externally form (he) sees,
lohitakāni lohitakavaṇṇāni lohitakanidassanāni lohitakanibhāsāni.
red ones, red in color, with a red hue, with a red tint.
idaṃ sattamaṃ abhibh'-āyatanaṃ.
This (is the) seventh overcoming-of-bases.

(8. Does not perceives internal rupa, sees external rupa white color)

8. ♦ “ajjhattaṃ a-rūpa-saññī eko bahiddhā rūpāni passati
(8) “internally not-form-percipent, *** externally form (he) sees,
odātāni odātavaṇṇāni odātanidassanāni odātanibhāsāni.
white ones, white in color, with a white hue, with a white tint.
idaṃ aṭṭhamaṃ abhibh'-āyatanaṃ.
This (is the) eighth overcoming-of-bases.
imāni kho, bhikkhave, aṭṭha abhibh-āyatanānī”ti. pañcamaṃ.
“These, bhikkhus, are the eight bases of overcoming.”

AN 8.65 b.bodhi version with footnotes from cmy

“Bhikkhus, there are these eight bases of overcoming.

1771 Abhibhāyatanāni.
From the descriptions both in the text and commentary, it seems that the “bases of overcoming” are actually approaches to the kasiṇas, described in detail in Vism, chaps. 4 and 5.
Mp: “The abhibhāyatanāni are causes of overcoming (abhibhavanakāraṇāni). What do they overcome? The adverse qualities and the objects. For they overcome the adverse qualities opposed to them (paṭipakkhabhāvena paccanīkadhamme) and, through a person’s superior knowledge, [they overcome] the objects (puggalassa ñāṇuttariyatāya ārammaṇāni).”

What eight?
(1) “One percipient of forms internally sees forms externally, limited, beautiful or ugly. Having overcome them, he is percipient thus: ‘I know, I see.’ This is the first basis of overcoming.

1772
Mp: “Percipient of forms internally (ajjhattaṃ rūpasaññī): This refers to the internal form used for the preliminary work. For someone does the preliminary work [of meditation] on a blue form, such as the head hairs, the bile, or the irises. Doing the preliminary work on a yellow form, he uses bodily fat, the skin, or the surfaces of the hands and feet, or a yellow area in the eyes. Doing the preliminary work on a red form, he uses flesh, blood, the tongue, or a red area in the eyes. Doing the preliminary work on a white form, he uses bones, teeth, nails, or the whites of the eyes. These are not perfectly blue, yellow, red, or white, but impure.
[He] sees forms externally (eko bahiddhā rūpāni passati): When the preliminary work has thus occurred internally, but the mark appears externally, he is said to be ‘one percipient of forms internally [who] sees forms externally,’ that is, his preliminary work is done internally but absorption (jhāna) occurs externally.
Having overcome them (tāni abhibhuyya): As a person with good digestion who has obtained a mere spoonful of food collects it together, thinking, ‘What is there to eat here?’ and uses limited ability, so a person whose knowledge is emerging, one of clear knowledge, thinks: ‘What is there to attain in regard to a limited object? This isn’t troublesome for me.’ Having overcome those forms, he enters an attainment, and with the arising of the mark he reaches absorption.
He is percipient thus (evaṃsaññī hoti): He is percipient with the perception of reflective attention (ābhoga) and with the perception of the jhāna.
I know, I see’ (jānāmi passāmi): By this, his reflective attention is spoken of; for that occurs after he has emerged from the attainment, not in the attainment itself. The perception of overcoming (abhibhavanasaññā) exists in the attainment, but the perception of reflective attention (ābhogasaññā) occurs after he has emerged from the attainment.”

(2) “One percipient of forms internally sees forms externally, measureless, beautiful or ugly. Having overcome them, he is percipient thus: ‘I know, I see.’ This is the second basis of overcoming.

1773
Mp: “As a hungry person who has obtained ample food does not see that meal as large but thinks: ‘Give me seconds and thirds. What will this do for me?’ so a person whose knowledge is emerging, one of clear knowledge, thinks: ‘What is there to attain here? This isn’t a measureless object. It isn’t troublesome for me to obtain one-pointedness of mind.’ Having overcome [those forms], he enters an attainment, and with the arising of the mark he reaches absorption.”

(3) “One not percipient of forms internally sees forms externally, limited, beautiful or ugly. Having overcome them, he is percipient thus: ‘I know, I see.’ This is the third basis of overcoming.

1774
Mp: “One not percipient of forms internally sees forms externally (ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī eko bahiddhā rūpāni passati): This describes one for whom the preliminary work and the mark have arisen externally. Thus both by way of the preliminary work and by way of absorption, he is called one who is not percipient of forms internally [but] sees forms externally.”

(4) “One not percipient of forms internally sees forms externally, measureless, beautiful or ugly. Having overcome them, he is percipient thus: ‘I know, I see.’ This is the fourth basis of overcoming.
(5) “One not percipient of forms internally sees forms externally, blue ones, blue in color, with a blue hue, with a blue tint. Having overcome them, he is percipient thus: ‘I know, I see.’ This is the fifth basis of overcoming.

1775 Mp: “From the fifth base of overcoming on, he shows their thorough purification. For these bases are stated by way of purified colors (visuddhavaṇṇavasen’eva).” The colored bases of overcoming are illustrated by similes below at 10:29, as well as at DN 16.3.29–32, II 110–11.

(6) “One not percipient of forms internally sees forms externally, yellow ones, yellow in color, with a yellow hue, with a yellow tint. Having overcome them, he is percipient thus: ‘I know, I see.’ This is the sixth basis of overcoming.
(7) “One not percipient of forms internally sees forms externally, red ones, red in color, with a red hue, with a red tint. Having overcome them, he is percipient thus: ‘I know, I see.’ This is the seventh basis of overcoming.

(8) “One not percipient of forms internally sees forms externally, white ones, white in color, with a white hue, with a white tint. Having overcome them, he is percipient thus: ‘I know, I see.’ This is the eighth basis of overcoming.
“These, bhikkhus, are the eight bases of overcoming.”

search results

These all just repeat AN 8.65
DN 16.19
DN 33.11
DN 34.9
MN 77.1
AN 1.382-493-562
AN 8.117-147-626
AN 10.29
ajjhattaṃ rūpasaññī (8)
DN
DN 2, 3. mahāparinibbānasuttaṃ, aṭṭha abhibhāyatanāni (DN 16.19), para. 1 ⇒
173. “aṭṭha kho imāni, ānanda, abhibhāyatanāni. katamāni aṭṭha ? ajjhattaṃ rūpasaññī eko bahiddhā rūpāni passati parittāni suvaṇṇadubbaṇṇāni. ‘tāni abhibhuyya jānāmi passāmī’ti evaṃsaññī hoti. idaṃ paṭhamaṃ abhibhāyatanaṃ.
DN 3, 10. saṅgītisuttaṃ, aṭṭhakaṃ (DN 33.11), para. 28 ⇒
338. “aṭṭha abhibhāyatanāni. ajjhattaṃ rūpasaññī eko bahiddhā rūpāni passati parittāni suvaṇṇadubbaṇṇāni, ‘tāni abhibhuyya jānāmi passāmī’ti evaṃsaññī hoti. idaṃ paṭhamaṃ abhibhāyatanaṃ.
DN 3, 11. dasuttarasuttaṃ, aṭṭha dhammā (DN 34.9), para. 38 ⇒
(jha) “katame aṭṭha dhammā abhiññeyyā? aṭṭha abhibhāyatanāni — ajjhattaṃ rūpasaññī eko bahiddhā rūpāni passati parittāni suvaṇṇadubbaṇṇāni, ‘tāni abhibhuyya jānāmi passāmī’ti — evaṃsaññī hoti. idaṃ paṭhamaṃ abhibhāyatanaṃ.
MN
MN 2, 3. paribbājakavaggo, 7. mahāsakuludāyisuttaṃ (MN 77.1), para. 33 ⇒
249. “puna caparaṃ, udāyi, akkhātā mayā sāvakānaṃ paṭipadā, yathāpaṭipannā me sāvakā aṭṭha abhibhāyatanāni bhāventi. ajjhattaṃ rūpasaññī eko bahiddhā rūpāni passati parittāni suvaṇṇadubbaṇṇāni. ‘tāni abhibhuyya jānāmi, passāmī’ti evaṃ saññī hoti. idaṃ paṭhamaṃ abhibhāyatanaṃ.
SN
AN
AN 1, 18. aparāccharāsaṅghātavaggo (AN 1.382-493-562), para. 10 ⇒
427-434. ajjhattaṃ rūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati parittāni suvaṇṇadubbaṇṇāni. ‘tāni abhibhuyya jānāmi passāmī’ti — evaṃsaññī hoti. ajjhattaṃ rūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati appamāṇāni suvaṇṇadubbaṇṇāni. ‘tāni abhibhuyya jānāmi passāmī’ti — evaṃsaññī hoti. ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati parittāni suvaṇṇadubbaṇṇāni. ‘tāni abhibhuyya jānāmi passāmī’ti — evaṃsaññī hoti. ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati appamāṇāni suvaṇṇadubbaṇṇāni. ‘tāni abhibhuyya jānāmi passāmī’ti — evaṃsaññī hoti. ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati nīlāni nīlavaṇṇāni nīlanidassanāni nīlanibhāsāni. ‘tāni abhibhuyya jānāmi passāmī’ti — evaṃsaññī hoti. ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati pītāni pītavaṇṇāni pītanidassanāni pītanibhāsāni. ‘tāni abhibhuyya jānāmi passāmī’ti — evaṃsaññī hoti. ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati lohitakāni lohitakavaṇṇāni lohitakanidassanāni lohitakanibhāsāni. ‘tāni abhibhuyya jānāmi passāmī’ti evaṃsaññī hoti. ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati odātāni odātavaṇṇāni odātanidassanāni odātanibhāsāni. ‘tāni abhibhuyya jānāmi passāmī’ti — evaṃsaññī hoti.
AN 8, 2. dutiyapaṇṇāsakaṃ, (7) 2. bhūmicālavaggo, 5. abhibhāyatanasuttaṃ (AN 8.65), para. 1 ⇒
65. “aṭṭhimāni, bhikkhave, abhibhāyatanāni. katamāni aṭṭha? ajjhattaṃ rūpasaññī eko bahiddhā rūpāni passati parittāni suvaṇṇadubbaṇṇāni. ‘tāni abhibhuyya jānāmi passāmī’ti, evaṃsaññī hoti. idaṃ paṭhamaṃ abhibhāyatanaṃ.
AN 8, 2. dutiyapaṇṇāsakaṃ, (11). rāgapeyyālaṃ (AN 8.117-147-626), para. 2 ⇒
118. “rāgassa, bhikkhave, abhiññāya aṭṭha dhammā bhāvetabbā. katame aṭṭha? ajjhattaṃ rūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati parittāni suvaṇṇadubbaṇṇāni, tāni abhibhuyya ‘jānāmi passāmī’ti evaṃsaññī hoti. ajjhattaṃ rūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati appamāṇāni suvaṇṇadubbaṇṇāni, tāni abhibhuyya ‘jānāmi passāmī’ti evaṃsaññī hoti. ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati parittāni suvaṇṇadubbaṇṇāni, tāni abhibhuyya ‘jānāmi passāmī’ti evaṃsaññī hoti. ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati appamāṇāni suvaṇṇadubbaṇṇāni, tāni abhibhuyya ‘jānāmi passāmī’ti evaṃsaññī hoti. ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati nīlāni nīlavaṇṇāni nīlanidassanāni nīlanibhāsāni pītāni pītavaṇṇāni . pe . lohitakāni lohitakavaṇṇāni . pe . odātāni odātavaṇṇāni . pe . odātanibhāsāni, tāni abhibhuyya ‘jānāmi passāmī’ti evaṃsaññī hoti — rāgassa, bhikkhave, abhiññāya ime aṭṭha dhammā bhāvetabbā”.
AN 10, 1. paṭhamapaṇṇāsakaṃ, 3. mahāvaggo, 9. paṭhamakosalasuttaṃ (AN 10.29), para. 6 ⇒
“aṭṭhimāni, bhikkhave, abhibhāyatanāni. katamāni aṭṭha? ajjhattaṃ rūpasaññī eko bahiddhā rūpāni passati parittāni suvaṇṇadubbaṇṇāni; ‘tāni abhibhuyya jānāmi passāmī’ti, evaṃsaññī hoti. idaṃ paṭhamaṃ abhibhāyatanaṃ.

Eight vimokkha

AN 8.66 vimokkha

vimokkha-suttaṃ n (AN 8.66)
A 8.66 Emancipations
♦ 66. “aṭṭh'-ime, bhikkhave, vimokkhā.
“(there are) eight-(of)-these, *********, emancipations. -1776-
katame aṭṭha?
Which eight?

1. Internal form, see external

1. rūpī rūpāni passati.
1. (for one possessing) form, forms (he) sees.
ayaṃ paṭhamo vimokkho.
this (is the) first liberation. -1777-

2. No internal form, sees external

2. ♦ “ajjhattaṃ a-rūpa-saññī,
2. "internally not-forms-percipient,
bahiddhā rūpāni passati.
externally forms (he) sees."
ayaṃ dutiyo vimokkho.
this (is the) second liberation. -1778-

3. Subha (beautiful) vimokkha

3. ♦ “subha-nteva adhimutto hoti.
3. "'beautiful' {one is} focused (on).
ayaṃ tatiyo vimokkho.
this (is the) third liberation." -1779-

4. STED (smd 5) ākāsā-nañcā-(a)yatanaṃ

STED (smd 5) Space-infinitude-dimension
sabbaso rūpa-saññānaṃ samatikkamā
(with) complete [physical] form-perceptions transcending,
Paṭigha-saññānaṃ atthaṅgamā
(with) resistance-perceptions disappearance,
nānatta-saññānaṃ a-manasikārā
(and) diversity-perceptions; non-attention (to them),
‘an-anto ākāso’ti
[perceiving,] 'In-finite space,'
ākāsānañcā-(a)yatanaṃ upasampajja viharati.
Space-infinitude-dimension, (he) enters, dwells.
ayaṃ catuttho vimokkho.
this (is the) fourth liberation.

5. STED (smd 6) viññāṇañcā-(a)yatanaṃ

STED (smd 6) Consciousness-infinitude-dimension
sabbaso ākāsānañcā-(a)yatanaṃ samatikkamma
(with) complete Space-infinitude-dimension's transcending,
An-antaṃ viññāṇanti
(perceiving,) 'In-finite consciousness,'
viññāṇañcā-(a)yatanaṃ upasampajja viharati.
Consciousness-infinitude-dimension, (he) enters, dwells.
ayaṃ pañcamo vimokkho.
this (is the) fifth liberation.

6. STED (smd 7) ākiñcaññā-(a)yatanaṃ

STED (smd 7) Nothingness-dimension
sabbaso viññāṇañcā-(a)yatanaṃ samatikkamma
(with) complete consciousness-infinitude-dimension's transcending
N-atthi kiñcīti
(perceiving,) 'There-is nothing,'
ākiñcaññā-(a)yatanaṃ upasampajja viharati.
Nothingness-dimension, (he) enters, dwells.
ayaṃ chaṭṭho vimokkho.
this (is the) sixth liberation.

7. STED Neva-saññā-nāsaññā-(a)yatanaṃ

STED (smd 8) Neither-perception-nor-non-perception-dimension
sabbaso ākiñcaññā-(a)yatanaṃ samatikkamma
(with) complete nothingness-dimension's transcending,
Neva-saññā-nāsaññā-(a)yatanaṃ upasampajja viharati.
Neither-perception-nor-non-perception-dimension, (he) enters, dwells
ayaṃ sattamo vimokkho.
this (is the) seventh liberation.

8. STED Saññā-vedayita-nirodhaṃ

STED (smd 9) Perception-feeling-cessation
sabbaso neva-saññā-nāsaññā-(a)yatanaṃ samatikkamma
(with) complete Neither-perception-nor-non-perception-dimension's transcending,
Saññā-vedayita-nirodhaṃ upasampajja viharati
Perception-feeling-cessation, (he) enters, dwells
ayaṃ aṭṭhamo vimokkho.
this (is the) eighth liberation.
ime kho, bhikkhave, aṭṭha vimokkhā”ti.
“These indeed, monks, (are teh) eight liberations.”
chaṭṭhaṃ.
(end of sutta)

1776 vimokkha footnote from bodhi

The word vimokkha is used here in a specific and limited sense and does not imply irreversible liberation of the mind from all defilements; this latter is usually indicated by akuppā cetovimutti or cetovimutti paññāvimutti.
Mp: “In what sense are they emancipations?
In the sense of releasing (adhimuccanaṭṭhena). In what sense releasing? In the sense of thoroughly freeing from adverse qualities, and in the sense of thoroughly freeing through delight in the object.
What is meant is [the mind’s] occurrence on the object without constraint, free from worry, like a child sleeping on his father’s lap, his body completely relaxed.
This second meaning [regarding the object] does not apply to the last emancipation, but only to the others [for in the last emancipation there is no object of perception].”

1777 1st liberation footnote from bodhi

Rūpī rūpāni passati.
Mp: “Here, ‘form’ is the jhāna with a form object, which has arisen by way of a blue kasiṇa, etc., based on something internal such as head hairs, etc.
One who gains this [jhāna] is said to possess form.
One might also see forms with the eye of jhāna externally, such as a blue kasiṇa, etc.
What is indicated by this are the four form-sphere jhānas in the case of a person who has attained jhāna through the kasiṇas with an internal or external basis.”

1778 2nd liberation footnote from bodhi

One not percipient of forms internally sees forms externally (ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī, bahiddhā rūpāni passati).
Mp: “One who is not percipient of forms internally is one who does not attain form-sphere jhānas based on his own head hairs, etc. What is shown by this are the form-sphere jhānas of one who attains jhāna externally, having done the preliminary work externally.”

1779 subha footnote from bodhi

Subhant’eva adhimutto hoti. Mp: “By this what is shown are jhānas based on extremely purified color kasiṇas, such as blue, etc.”
Mp points out that Paṭis, a canonical exegetical treatise, defines the emancipation on the beautiful as the four immeasurable states (loving-kindness, compassion, altruistic joy, and equanimity); see Paṭis II 39,14–26.
It seems that the first emancipation comprises the first two bases of overcoming; the second, the second two bases of overcoming; and the third, the remaining four bases of overcoming.

search results

rūpī rūpāni (11)
DN
DN 2, 2. mahānidānasuttaṃ, aṭṭha vimokkhā (DN 15.6), para. 1 ⇒
129. “aṭṭha kho ime, ānanda, vimokkhā. katame aṭṭha? rūpī rūpāni passati ayaṃ paṭhamo vimokkho. ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati, ayaṃ dutiyo vimokkho. subhanteva adhimutto hoti, ayaṃ tatiyo vimokkho. sabbaso rūpasaññānaṃ samatikkamā paṭighasaññānaṃ atthaṅgamā nānattasaññānaṃ amanasikārā ‘ananto ākāso’ti ākāsānañcāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati, ayaṃ catuttho vimokkho. sabbaso ākāsānañcāyatanaṃ samatikkamma ‘anantaṃ viññāṇan’ti viññāṇañcāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati, ayaṃ pañcamo vimokkho. sabbaso viññāṇañcāyatanaṃ samatikkamma ‘natthi kiñcī’ti ākiñcaññāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati, ayaṃ chaṭṭho vimokkho. sabbaso ākiñcaññāyatanaṃ samatikkamma ‘nevasaññānāsaññā’yatanaṃ upasampajja viharati, ayaṃ sattamo vimokkho. sabbaso nevasaññānāsaññāyatanaṃ samatikkamma saññāvedayitanirodhaṃ upasampajja viharati, ayaṃ aṭṭhamo vimokkho. ime kho, ānanda, aṭṭha vimokkhā.
DN 2, 3. mahāparinibbānasuttaṃ, aṭṭha vimokkhā (DN 16.20), para. 1 ⇒
174. “aṭṭha kho ime, ānanda, vimokkhā. katame aṭṭha? rūpī rūpāni passati, ayaṃ paṭhamo vimokkho. ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati, ayaṃ dutiyo vimokkho. subhanteva adhimutto hoti, ayaṃ tatiyo vimokkho. sabbaso rūpasaññānaṃ samatikkamā paṭighasaññānaṃ atthaṅgamā nānattasaññānaṃ amanasikārā ‘ananto ākāso’ti ākāsānañcāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati, ayaṃ catuttho vimokkho. sabbaso ākāsānañcāyatanaṃ samatikkamma ‘anantaṃ viññāṇan’ti viññāṇañcāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati, ayaṃ pañcamo vimokkho. sabbaso viññāṇañcāyatanaṃ samatikkamma ‘natthi kiñcī’ti ākiñcaññāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati, ayaṃ chaṭṭho vimokkho. sabbaso ākiñcaññāyatanaṃ samatikkamma nevasaññānāsaññāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati. ayaṃ sattamo vimokkho. sabbaso nevasaññānāsaññāyatanaṃ samatikkamma saññāvedayitanirodhaṃ upasampajja viharati, ayaṃ aṭṭhamo vimokkho. ime kho, ānanda, aṭṭha vimokkhā.
DN 3, 10. saṅgītisuttaṃ, aṭṭhakaṃ (DN 33.11), para. 36 ⇒
339. “aṭṭha vimokkhā. rūpī rūpāni passati. ayaṃ paṭhamo vimokkho.
DN 3, 11. dasuttarasuttaṃ, aṭṭha dhammā (DN 34.9), para. 46 ⇒
(ña) “katame aṭṭha dhammā sacchikātabbā? aṭṭha vimokkhā — rūpī rūpāni passati. ayaṃ paṭhamo vimokkho.
MN
MN 2, 3. paribbājakavaggo, 7. mahāsakuludāyisuttaṃ (MN 77.1), para. 32 ⇒
248. “puna caparaṃ, udāyi, akkhātā mayā sāvakānaṃ paṭipadā, yathāpaṭipannā me sāvakā aṭṭha vimokkhe bhāventi. rūpī rūpāni passati, ayaṃ paṭhamo vimokkho; ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati, ayaṃ dutiyo vimokkho; subhanteva adhimutto hoti, ayaṃ tatiyo vimokkho; sabbaso rūpasaññānaṃ samatikkamā paṭighasaññānaṃ atthaṅgamā nānattasaññānaṃ amanasikārā ‘ananto ākāso’ti ākāsānañcāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati, ayaṃ catuttho vimokkho; sabbaso ākāsānañcāyatanaṃ samatikkamma ‘anantaṃ viññāṇan’ti viññāṇañcāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati, ayaṃ pañcamo vimokkho; sabbaso viññāṇañcāyatanaṃ samatikkamma ‘natthi kiñcī’ti ākiñcaññāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati, ayaṃ chaṭṭho vimokkho; sabbaso ākiñcaññāyatanaṃ samatikkamma nevasaññānāsaññāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati, ayaṃ sattamo vimokkho; sabbaso nevasaññānāsaññāyatanaṃ samatikkamma saññāvedayitanirodhaṃ upasampajja viharati, ayaṃ aṭṭhamo vimokkho. tatra ca pana me sāvakā bahū abhiññāvosānapāramippattā viharanti.
MN 3, 4. vibhaṅgavaggo, 7. saḷāyatanavibhaṅgasuttaṃ (MN 137.1), para. 25 ⇒
312. “‘so vuccati yoggācariyānaṃ anuttaro purisadammasārathī’ti — iti kho panetaṃ vuttaṃ. kiñcetaṃ paṭicca vuttaṃ? hatthidamakena, bhikkhave, hatthidammo sārito ekaṃyeva disaṃ dhāvati — puratthimaṃ vā pacchimaṃ vā uttaraṃ vā dakkhiṇaṃ vā. assadamakena, bhikkhave, assadammo sārito ekaññeva disaṃ dhāvati — puratthimaṃ vā pacchimaṃ vā uttaraṃ vā dakkhiṇaṃ vā. godamakena, bhikkhave, godammo sārito ekaṃyeva disaṃ dhāvati — puratthimaṃ vā pacchimaṃ vā uttaraṃ vā dakkhiṇaṃ vā. tathāgatena hi, bhikkhave, arahatā sammāsambuddhena purisadammo sārito aṭṭha disā vidhāvati. rūpī rūpāni passati — ayaṃ ekā disā; ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati — ayaṃ dutiyā disā; subhantveva adhimutto hoti — ayaṃ tatiyā disā; sabbaso rūpasaññānaṃ samatikkamā paṭighasaññānaṃ atthaṅgamā nānattasaññānaṃ amanasikārā ‘ananto ākāso’ti ākāsānañcāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati — ayaṃ catutthī disā; sabbaso ākāsānañcāyatanaṃ samatikkamma ‘anantaṃ viññāṇan’ti viññāṇañcāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati — ayaṃ pañcamī disā; sabbaso viññāṇañcāyatanaṃ samatikkamma ‘natthi kiñcī’ti ākiñcaññāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati — ayaṃ chaṭṭhī disā; sabbaso ākiñcaññāyatanaṃ samatikkamma nevasaññānāsaññāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati — ayaṃ sattamī disā; sabbaso nevasaññānāsaññāyatanaṃ samatikkamma saññāvedayitanirodhaṃ upasampajja viharati — ayaṃ aṭṭhamī disā. tathāgatena, bhikkhave, arahatā sammāsambuddhena purisadammo sārito imā aṭṭha disā vidhāvati. ‘so vuccati yoggācariyānaṃ anuttaro purisadammasārathī’ti — iti yaṃ taṃ vuttaṃ idametaṃ paṭicca vuttan”ti.
SN
AN
AN 1, 18. aparāccharāsaṅghātavaggo (AN 1.382-493-562), para. 11 ⇒
435-442. rūpī rūpāni passati. ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati subhanteva adhimutto hoti. sabbaso rūpasaññānaṃ samatikkamā paṭighasaññānaṃ atthaṅgamā nānattasaññānaṃ amanasikārā ananto ākāsoti ākāsānañcāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati. sabbaso ākāsānañcāyatanaṃ samatikkamma anantaṃ viññāṇanti viññāṇañcāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati. sabbaso viññāṇañcāyatanaṃ samatikkamma natthi kiñcīti ākiñcaññāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati. sabbaso ākiñcaññāyatanaṃ samatikkamma nevasaññānāsaññāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati. sabbaso nevasaññānāsaññāyatanaṃ samatikkamma saññāvedayitanirodhaṃ upasampajja viharati.
AN 8, 2. dutiyapaṇṇāsakaṃ, (7) 2. bhūmicālavaggo, 6. vimokkhasuttaṃ (AN 8.66), para. 1 ⇒
66. “aṭṭhime, bhikkhave, vimokkhā. katame aṭṭha? rūpī rūpāni passati. ayaṃ paṭhamo vimokkho.
AN 8, 2. dutiyapaṇṇāsakaṃ, (11). rāgapeyyālaṃ (AN 8.117-147-626), para. 3 ⇒
119. “rāgassa, bhikkhave, abhiññāya aṭṭha dhammā bhāvetabbā. katame aṭṭha? rūpī rūpāni passati, ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passati, subhanteva adhimutto hoti, sabbaso rūpasaññānaṃ samatikkamā paṭighasaññānaṃ atthaṅgamā nānattasaññānaṃ amanasikārā ‘ananto ākāso’ti ākāsānañcāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati, sabbaso ākāsānañcāyatanaṃ samatikkamma ‘anantaṃ viññāṇan’ti viññāṇañcāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati, sabbaso viññāṇañcāyatanaṃ samatikkamma ‘natthi kiñcī’ti ākiñcaññāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati, sabbaso ākiñcaññāyatanaṃ samatikkamma nevasaññānāsaññāyatanaṃ upasampajja viharati, sabbaso nevasaññānāsaññāyatanaṃ samatikkamma saññāvedayitanirodhaṃ upasampajja viharati — rāgassa, bhikkhave, abhiññāya ime aṭṭha dhammā bhāvetabbā”.
KN
KN Paṭis, 1. mahāvaggo, 5. vimokkhakathā, 1. uddeso, para. 2 ⇒
“api ca, aṭṭhasaṭṭhi vimokkhā — suññato vimokkho, animitto vimokkho, appaṇihito vimokkho; ajjhattavuṭṭhāno vimokkho, bahiddhāvuṭṭhāno vimokkho, dubhato vuṭṭhāno vimokkho; ajjhattavuṭṭhānā cattāro vimokkhā, bahiddhāvuṭṭhānā cattāro vimokkhā, dubhato vuṭṭhānā cattāro vimokkhā; ajjhattavuṭṭhānānaṃ anulomā cattāro vimokkhā, bahiddhāvuṭṭhānānaṃ anulomā cattāro vimokkhā, dubhato vuṭṭhānānaṃ anulomā cattāro vimokkhā; ajjhattavuṭṭhānapaṭippassaddhī cattāro vimokkhā, bahiddhāvuṭṭhānapaṭippassaddhī cattāro vimokkhā, dubhato vuṭṭhānapaṭippassaddhī cattāro vimokkhā; rūpī rūpāni passatīti vimokkho, ajjhattaṃ arūpasaññī bahiddhā rūpāni passatīti vimokkho, subhaṃ teva adhimutto hotīti vimokkho; ākāsānañcāyatanasamāpatti vimokkho, viññāṇañcāyatanasamāpatti vimokkho, ākiñcaññāyatanasamāpatti vimokkho; nevasaññānāsaññāyatanasamāpatti vimokkho, saññāvedayitanirodhasamāpatti vimokkho; samayavimokkho, asamayavimokkho; sāmayiko vimokkho, asāmayiko vimokkho; kuppo vimokkho, akuppo vimokkho; lokiyo vimokkho, lokuttaro vimokkho; sāsavo vimokkho, anāsavo vimokkho; sāmiso vimokkho, nirāmiso vimokkho; nirāmisānirāmisataro vimokkho, paṇihito vimokkho, appaṇihito vimokkho, paṇihitappaṭippassaddhi vimokkho; saññutto vimokkho, visaññutto vimokkho; ekattavimokkho, nānattavimokkho, saññāvimokkho, ñāṇavimokkho; sītisiyāvimokkho, jhānavimokkho, anupādācittassa vimokkho”.
KN Paṭis, 1. mahāvaggo, 5. vimokkhakathā, 2. niddeso, para. 14 ⇒
212. kathaṃ rūpī rūpāni passatīti — vimokkho? idhekacco ajjhattaṃ paccattaṃ nīlanimittaṃ manasikaroti, nīlasaññaṃ paṭilabhati. so taṃ nimittaṃ suggahitaṃ karoti, sūpadhāritaṃ upadhāreti, svāvatthitaṃ avatthāpeti. so taṃ nimittaṃ suggahitaṃ katvā sūpadhāritaṃ upadhāretvā svāvatthitaṃ avatthāpetvā bahiddhā nīlanimitte cittaṃ upasaṃharati, nīlasaññaṃ paṭilabhati. so taṃ nimittaṃ suggahitaṃ karoti, sūpadhāritaṃ upadhāreti, svāvatthitaṃ avatthāpeti. so taṃ nimittaṃ suggahitaṃ katvā upadhāretvā svāvatthitaṃ avatthāpetvā āsevati bhāveti bahulīkaroti. tassa evaṃ hoti — “ajjhattañca bahiddhā ca ubhayamidaṃ rūpan”ti, rūpasaññī hoti. idhekacco ajjhattaṃ paccattaṃ pītanimittaṃ . pe . lohitanimittaṃ . pe . odātanimittaṃ manasikaroti, odātasaññaṃ paṭilabhati. so taṃ nimittaṃ suggahitaṃ karoti, sūpadhāritaṃ upadhāreti, svāvatthitaṃ avatthāpeti. so taṃ nimittaṃ suggahitaṃ katvā sūpadhāritaṃ upadhāretvā svāvatthitaṃ avatthāpetvā bahiddhā odātanimitte cittaṃ upasaṃharati, odātasaññaṃ paṭilabhati. so taṃ nimittaṃ suggahitaṃ karoti, sūpadhāritaṃ upadhāreti, svāvatthitaṃ avatthāpeti. so taṃ nimittaṃ suggahitaṃ katvā sūpadhāritaṃ upadhāretvā svāvatthitaṃ avatthāpetvā āsevati bhāveti bahulīkaroti. tassa evaṃ hoti — “ajjhattañca bahiddhā ca ubhayamidaṃ rūpan”ti, rūpasaññī hoti. evaṃ rūpī rūpāni passatīti — vimokkho.

sesarch results for ‘kasina’

DN
DN 3, 10. saṅgītisuttaṃ, dasakaṃ (DN 33.13), para. 12 ⇒
346. dasa kasiṇāyatanāni. pathavīkasiṇameko sañjānāti, uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ advayaṃ appamāṇaṃ. āpokasiṇameko sañjānāti . pe . tejokasiṇameko sañjānāti. vāyokasiṇameko sañjānāti. nīlakasiṇameko sañjānāti. pītakasiṇameko sañjānāti. lohitakasiṇameko sañjānāti. odātakasiṇameko sañjānāti. ākāsakasiṇameko sañjānāti. viññāṇakasiṇameko sañjānāti, uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ advayaṃ appamāṇaṃ.
DN 3, 11. dasuttarasuttaṃ, dasa dhammā (DN 34.11), para. 12 ⇒
(kha) “katame dasa dhammā bhāvetabbā? dasa kasiṇāyatanāni — pathavīkasiṇameko sañjānāti uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ advayaṃ appamāṇaṃ. āpokasiṇameko sañjānāti . pe . tejokasiṇameko sañjānāti. vāyokasiṇameko sañjānāti. nīlakasiṇameko sañjānāti. pītakasiṇameko sañjānāti. lohitakasiṇameko sañjānāti. odātakasiṇameko sañjānāti. ākāsakasiṇameko sañjānāti. viññāṇakasiṇameko sañjānāti uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ advayaṃ appamāṇaṃ . ime dasa dhammā bhāvetabbā.
MN
MN 1, 5. cūḷayamakavaggo, 9. brahmanimantanikasuttaṃ (MN 49.1), para. 6 ⇒
5.3. “evaṃ vutte, bhikkhave, bako brahmā maṃ etadavoca — ‘ahañhi, mārisa, niccaṃyeva samānaṃ niccanti vadāmi, dhuvaṃyeva samānaṃ dhuvanti vadāmi, sassataṃyeva samānaṃ sassatanti vadāmi, kevalaṃyeva samānaṃ kevalanti vadāmi, acavanadhammaṃyeva samānaṃ acavanadhamman’ti vadāmi, yattha ca pana na jāyati na jīyati na mīyati na cavati na upapajjati tadevāhaṃ vadāmi — ‘idañhi na jāyati na jīyati na mīyati na cavati na upapajjatī’ti. asantañca panaññaṃ uttari nissaraṇaṃ ‘natthaññaṃ uttari nissaraṇan’ti vadāmi. ahesuṃ kho, bhikkhu, tayā pubbe samaṇabrāhmaṇā lokasmiṃ yāvatakaṃ tuyhaṃ kasiṇaṃ āyu tāvatakaṃ tesaṃ tapokammameva ahosi. te kho evaṃ jāneyyuṃ — ‘santañca panaññaṃ uttari nissaraṇaṃ atthaññaṃ uttari nissaraṇanti, asantaṃ vā aññaṃ uttari nissaraṇaṃ natthaññaṃ uttari nissaraṇan’ti. taṃ tāhaṃ, bhikkhu, evaṃ vadāmi — ‘na cevaññaṃ uttari nissaraṇaṃ dakkhissasi, yāvadeva ca pana kilamathassa vighātassa bhāgī bhavissasi. sace kho tvaṃ, bhikkhu, pathaviṃ ajjhosissasi, opasāyiko me bhavissasi vatthusāyiko, yathākāmakaraṇīyo bāhiteyyo. sace āpaṃ. tejaṃ. vāyaṃ. bhūte. deve. pajāpatiṃ. brahmaṃ ajjhosissasi, opasāyiko me bhavissasi vatthusāyiko, yathākāmakaraṇīyo bāhiteyyo’ti.
MN 2, 3. paribbājakavaggo, 7. mahāsakuludāyisuttaṃ (MN 77.1), para. 41 ⇒
25.. “puna caparaṃ, udāyi, akkhātā mayā sāvakānaṃ paṭipadā, yathāpaṭipannā me sāvakā dasa kasiṇāyatanāni bhāventi. pathavīkasiṇameko sañjānāti uddhamadho tiriyaṃ advayaṃ appamāṇaṃ; āpokasiṇameko sañjānāti . pe . tejokasiṇameko sañjānāti. vāyokasiṇameko sañjānāti. nīlakasiṇameko sañjānāti. pītakasiṇameko sañjānāti. lohitakasiṇameko sañjānāti. odātakasiṇameko sañjānāti. ākāsakasiṇameko sañjānāti . viññāṇakasiṇameko sañjānāti uddhamadho tiriyaṃ advayaṃ appamāṇaṃ. tatra ca pana me sāvakā bahū abhiññāvosānapāramippattā viharanti.
MN 3, 1. devadahavaggo, 2. pañcattayasuttaṃ {pañcāyatanasutta (ka0)} (MN 102.1), para. 2 ⇒
22. “tatra, bhikkhave, ye te samaṇabrāhmaṇā saññiṃ attānaṃ paññapenti arogaṃ paraṃ maraṇā, rūpiṃ vā te bhonto samaṇabrāhmaṇā saññiṃ attānaṃ paññapenti arogaṃ paraṃ maraṇā, arūpiṃ vā te bhonto samaṇabrāhmaṇā saññiṃ attānaṃ paññapenti arogaṃ paraṃ maraṇā, rūpiñca arūpiñca vā te bhonto samaṇabrāhmaṇā saññiṃ attānaṃ paññapenti arogaṃ paraṃ maraṇā, nevarūpiṃ nārūpiṃ vā te bhonto samaṇabrāhmaṇā saññiṃ attānaṃ paññapenti arogaṃ paraṃ maraṇā, ekattasaññiṃ vā te bhonto samaṇabrāhmaṇā saññiṃ attānaṃ paññapenti arogaṃ paraṃ maraṇā, nānattasaññiṃ vā te bhonto samaṇabrāhmaṇā saññiṃ attānaṃ paññapenti arogaṃ paraṃ maraṇā, parittasaññiṃ vā te bhonto samaṇabrāhmaṇā saññiṃ attānaṃ paññapenti arogaṃ paraṃ maraṇā, appamāṇasaññiṃ vā te bhonto samaṇabrāhmaṇā saññiṃ attānaṃ paññapenti arogaṃ paraṃ maraṇā, etaṃ vā panekesaṃ upātivattataṃ viññāṇakasiṇameke abhivadanti appamāṇaṃ āneñjaṃ . tayidaṃ, bhikkhave, tathāgato abhijānāti . ye kho te bhonto samaṇabrāhmaṇā saññiṃ attānaṃ paññapenti arogaṃ paraṃ maraṇā, rūpiṃ vā te bhonto samaṇabrāhmaṇā saññiṃ attānaṃ paññapenti arogaṃ paraṃ maraṇā, arūpiṃ vā te bhonto samaṇabrāhmaṇā saññiṃ attānaṃ paññapenti arogaṃ paraṃ maraṇā, rūpiñca arūpiñca vā te bhonto samaṇabrāhmaṇā saññiṃ attānaṃ paññapenti arogaṃ paraṃ maraṇā, nevarūpiṃ nārūpiṃ vā te bhonto samaṇabrāhmaṇā saññiṃ attānaṃ paññapenti arogaṃ paraṃ maraṇā, ekattasaññiṃ vā te bhonto samaṇabrāhmaṇā saññiṃ attānaṃ paññapenti arogaṃ paraṃ maraṇā, nānattasaññiṃ vā te bhonto samaṇabrāhmaṇā saññiṃ attānaṃ paññapenti arogaṃ paraṃ maraṇā, parittasaññiṃ vā te bhonto samaṇabrāhmaṇā saññiṃ attānaṃ paññapenti arogaṃ paraṃ maraṇā, appamāṇasaññiṃ vā te bhonto samaṇabrāhmaṇā saññiṃ attānaṃ paññapenti arogaṃ paraṃ maraṇā, yā vā panetāsaṃ saññānaṃ parisuddhā paramā aggā anuttariyā akkhāyati — yadi rūpasaññānaṃ yadi arūpasaññānaṃ yadi ekattasaññānaṃ yadi nānattasaññānaṃ. ‘natthi kiñcī’ti ākiñcaññāyatanameke abhivadanti appamāṇaṃ āneñjaṃ. ‘tayidaṃ saṅkhataṃ oḷārikaṃ atthi kho pana saṅkhārānaṃ nirodho atthetan’ti — iti viditvā tassa nissaraṇadassāvī tathāgato tadupātivatto.
SN
AN
AN 1, 18. aparāccharāsaṅghātavaggo (AN 1.382-493-562), para. 12 ⇒
443-452. pathavīkasiṇaṃ bhāveti. āpokasiṇaṃ bhāveti. tejokasiṇaṃ bhāveti. vāyokasiṇaṃ bhāveti. nīlakasiṇaṃ bhāveti. pītakasiṇaṃ bhāveti. lohitakasiṇaṃ bhāveti. odātakasiṇaṃ bhāveti. ākāsakasiṇaṃ bhāveti. viññāṇakasiṇaṃ bhāveti.
AN 10, 1. paṭhamapaṇṇāsakaṃ, 3. mahāvaggo, 5. kasiṇasuttaṃ (AN 10.25), para. 1 ⇒
25. “dasayimāni, bhikkhave, kasiṇāyatanāni. katamāni dasa? pathavīkasiṇameko sañjānāti uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ advayaṃ appamāṇaṃ; āpokasiṇameko sañjānāti . pe . tejokasiṇameko sañjānāti. vāyokasiṇameko sañjānāti. nīlakasiṇameko sañjānāti. pītakasiṇameko sañjānāti. lohitakasiṇameko sañjānāti. odātakasiṇameko sañjānāti. ākāsakasiṇameko sañjānāti. viññāṇakasiṇameko sañjānāti uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ advayaṃ appamāṇaṃ. imāni kho, bhikkhave, dasa kasiṇāyatanānī”ti. pañcamaṃ.
AN 10, 1. paṭhamapaṇṇāsakaṃ, 3. mahāvaggo, 6. kāḷīsuttaṃ (AN 10.26), para. 8 ⇒
“pathavīkasiṇasamāpattiparamā kho, bhagini, eke samaṇabrāhmaṇā ‘attho’ti abhinibbattesuṃ . yāvatā kho, bhagini, pathavīkasiṇasamāpattiparamatā, tadabhiññāsi bhagavā. tadabhiññāya bhagavā assādamaddasa ādīnavamaddasa nissaraṇamaddasa maggāmaggañāṇadassanamaddasa. tassa assādadassanahetu ādīnavadassanahetu nissaraṇadassanahetu maggāmaggañāṇadassanahetu atthassa patti hadayassa santi viditā hoti.
AN 10, 1. paṭhamapaṇṇāsakaṃ, 3. mahāvaggo, 6. kāḷīsuttaṃ (AN 10.26), para. 9 ⇒
“āpokasiṇasamāpattiparamā kho, bhagini . pe . tejokasiṇasamāpattiparamā kho, bhagini. vāyokasiṇasamāpattiparamā kho, bhagini. nīlakasiṇasamāpattiparamā kho, bhagini. pītakasiṇasamāpattiparamā kho, bhagini. lohitakasiṇasamāpattiparamā kho, bhagini. odātakasiṇasamāpattiparamā kho, bhagini. ākāsakasiṇasamāpattiparamā kho, bhagini. viññāṇakasiṇasamāpattiparamā kho, bhagini, eke samaṇabrāhmaṇā ‘attho’ti abhinibbattesuṃ . yāvatā kho, bhagini, viññāṇakasiṇasamāpattiparamatā, tadabhiññāsi bhagavā. tadabhiññāya bhagavā assādamaddasa ādīnavamaddasa nissaraṇamaddasa maggāmaggañāṇadassanamaddasa. tassa assādadassanahetu ādīnavadassanahetu nissaraṇadassanahetu maggāmaggañāṇadassanahetu atthassa patti hadayassa santi viditā hoti. iti kho, bhagini, yaṃ taṃ vuttaṃ bhagavatā kumāripañhesu —
AN 10, 1. paṭhamapaṇṇāsakaṃ, 3. mahāvaggo, 9. paṭhamakosalasuttaṃ (AN 10.29), para. 4 ⇒
“dasayimāni, bhikkhave, kasiṇāyatanāni. katamāni dasa? pathavīkasiṇameko sañjānāti uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ advayaṃ appamāṇaṃ; āpokasiṇameko sañjānāti . pe . tejokasiṇameko sañjānāti. vāyokasiṇameko sañjānāti. nīlakasiṇameko sañjānāti. pītakasiṇameko sañjānāti. lohitakasiṇameko sañjānāti. odātakasiṇameko sañjānāti. ākāsakasiṇameko sañjānāti. viññāṇakasiṇameko sañjānāti uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ advayaṃ appamāṇaṃ. imāni kho, bhikkhave, dasa kasiṇāyatanāni.
AN 10, 1. paṭhamapaṇṇāsakaṃ, 3. mahāvaggo, 9. paṭhamakosalasuttaṃ (AN 10.29), para. 5 ⇒
“etadaggaṃ, bhikkhave, imesaṃ dasannaṃ kasiṇāyatanānaṃ yadidaṃ viññāṇakasiṇaṃ eko sañjānāti uddhaṃ adho tiriyaṃ advayaṃ appamāṇaṃ. evaṃsaññinopi kho, bhikkhave, santi sattā. evaṃsaññīnampi kho, bhikkhave, sattānaṃ attheva aññathattaṃ atthi vipariṇāmo. evaṃ passaṃ, bhikkhave, sutavā ariyasāvako tasmimpi nibbindati. tasmiṃ nibbindanto agge virajjati, pageva hīnasmiṃ.
KN
KN Ja 2, 22. mahānipāto, 542. umaṅgajātakaṃ (5) (KN 15.542), para. 364 ⇒
“rakkhitvā kasiṇaṃ rattiṃ, cūḷaneyyo mahabbalo.
KN Nidd I, 7. tissametteyyasuttaniddeso, para. 24 ⇒
metteyyāti bhagavā taṃ theraṃ gottena ālapati. bhagavāti gāravādhivacanaṃ. api ca bhaggarāgoti bhagavā, bhaggadosoti bhagavā, bhaggamohoti bhagavā, bhaggamānoti bhagavā, bhaggadiṭṭhīti bhagavā, bhaggakaṇḍakoti bhagavā, bhaggakilesoti bhagavā, bhaji vibhaji pavibhaji dhammaratananti bhagavā, bhavānaṃ antakaroti bhagavā, bhāvitakāyo bhāvitasīlo bhāvitacitto bhāvitapaññoti bhagavā, bhaji vā bhagavā araññavanapatthāni pantāni senāsanāni appasaddāni appanigghosāni vijanavātāni manussarāhasseyyakāni paṭisallānasāruppānīti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā cīvarapiṇḍapātasenāsanagilānapaccayabhesajjaparikkhārānanti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā attharasassa dhammarasassa vimuttirasassa adhisīlassa adhicittassa adhipaññāyāti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā catunnaṃ jhānānaṃ catunnaṃ appamaññānaṃ catunnaṃ arūpasamāpattīnanti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā aṭṭhannaṃ vimokkhānaṃ aṭṭhannaṃ abhibhāyatanānaṃ navannaṃ anupubbavihārasamāpattīnanti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā dasannaṃ saññābhāvanānaṃ dasannaṃ kasiṇasamāpattīnaṃ ānāpānassatisamādhissa asubhasamāpattiyāti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā catunnaṃ satipaṭṭhānānaṃ catunnaṃ sammappadhānānaṃ catunnaṃ iddhipādānaṃ pañcannaṃ indriyānaṃ pañcannaṃ balānaṃ sattannaṃ bojjhaṅgānaṃ ariyassa aṭṭhaṅgikassa maggassāti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā dasannaṃ tathāgatabalānaṃ catunnaṃ vesārajjānaṃ catunnaṃ paṭisambhidānaṃ channaṃ abhiññānaṃ channaṃ buddhadhammānanti bhagavā. bhagavāti netaṃ nāmaṃ mātarā kataṃ, na pitarā kataṃ, na bhātarā kataṃ, na bhaginiyā kataṃ, na mittāmaccehi kataṃ, na ñātisālohitehi kataṃ na samaṇabrāhmaṇehi kataṃ, na devatāhi kataṃ. vimokkhantikametaṃ buddhānaṃ bhagavantānaṃ bodhiyā mūle saha sabbaññutaññāṇassa paṭilābhā sacchikā paññatti yadidaṃ bhagavāti — metteyyāti bhagavā.
KN Nidd I, 10. purābhedasuttaniddeso, para. 17 ⇒
bhagavāti gāravādhivacanaṃ. api ca bhaggarāgoti bhagavā, bhaggadosoti bhagavā, bhaggamohoti bhagavā, bhaggamānoti bhagavā, bhaggadiṭṭhīti bhagavā, bhaggataṇhoti bhagavā, bhaggakilesoti bhagavā, bhaji vibhaji pavibhaji dhammaratananti bhagavā, bhavānaṃ antakaroti bhagavā, bhāvitakāyo bhāvitasīlo bhāvitacitto bhāvitapaññoti bhagavā, bhaji vā bhagavā araññavanapatthāni pantāni senāsanāni appasaddāni appanigghosāni vijanavātāni manussarāhasseyyakāni paṭisallānasāruppānīti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā cīvarapiṇḍapātasenāsanagilānapaccayabhesajjaparikkhārānanti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā attharasassa dhammarasassa vimuttirasassa adhisīlassa adhicittassa adhipaññāyāti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā catunnaṃ jhānānaṃ catunnaṃ appamaññānaṃ catunnaṃ arūpasamāpattīnanti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā aṭṭhannaṃ vimokkhānaṃ aṭṭhannaṃ abhibhāyatanānaṃ navannaṃ anupubbavihārasamāpattīnanti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā dasannaṃ paññābhāvanānaṃ dasannaṃ kasiṇasamāpattīnaṃ ānāpānassatisamādhissa asubhasamāpattiyāti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā catunnaṃ satipaṭṭhānānaṃ catunnaṃ sammappadhānānaṃ catunnaṃ iddhipādānaṃ pañcannaṃ indriyānaṃ pañcannaṃ balānaṃ sattannaṃ bojjhaṅgānaṃ ariyassa aṭṭhaṅgikassa maggassāti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā dasannaṃ tathāgatabalānaṃ catunnaṃ vesārajjānaṃ catunnaṃ paṭisambhidānaṃ channaṃ abhiññānaṃ channaṃ buddhadhammānanti bhagavā. bhagavāti netaṃ nāmaṃ mātarā kataṃ, na pitarā kataṃ, na bhātarā kataṃ, na bhaginiyā kataṃ, na mittāmaccehi kataṃ, na ñātisālohitehi kataṃ, na samaṇabrāhmaṇehi kataṃ, na devatāhi kataṃ; vimokkhantikametaṃ buddhānaṃ bhagavantānaṃ bodhiyā mūle saha sabbaññutañāṇassa paṭilābhā sacchikā paññatti yadidaṃ bhagavāti — vītataṇho purābhedāti bhagavā.
KN Nidd I, 13. mahāviyūhasuttaniddeso, para. 222 ⇒
bhagavāti gāravādhivacanaṃ. api ca bhaggarāgoti bhagavā, bhaggadosoti bhagavā, bhaggamohoti bhagavā, bhaggamānoti bhagavā, bhaggadiṭṭhīti bhagavā, bhaggakaṇḍakoti bhagavā, bhaggakilesoti bhagavā, bhaji vibhaji pavibhaji dhammaratananti bhagavā, bhavānaṃ antakaroti bhagavā, bhāvitakāyo bhāvitasīlo bhāvitacitto bhāvitapaññoti bhagavā; bhāgī vā bhagavā araññavanapatthāni pantāni senāsanāni appasaddāni appanigghosāni vijanavātāni manussarāhasseyyakāni paṭisallānasāruppānīti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā cīvarapiṇḍapātasenāsanagilānapaccayabhesajjaparikkhārānanti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā attharasassa dhammarasassa vimuttirasassa adhisīlassa adhicittassa adhipaññāyāti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā catunnaṃ jhānānaṃ catunnaṃ appamaññānaṃ catunnaṃ arūpasamāpattīnanti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā aṭṭhannaṃ vimokkhānaṃ aṭṭhannaṃ abhibhāyatanānaṃ navannaṃ anupubbavihārasamāpattīnanti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā dasannaṃ saññābhāvanānaṃ dasannaṃ kasiṇasamāpattīnaṃ ānāpānassatisamādhissa asubhasamāpattiyāti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā catunnaṃ satipaṭṭhānānaṃ catunnaṃ sammappadhānānaṃ catunnaṃ iddhipādānaṃ pañcannaṃ indriyānaṃ pañcannaṃ balānaṃ sattannaṃ bojjhaṅgānaṃ ariyassa aṭṭhaṅgikassa maggassāti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā dasannaṃ tathāgatabalānaṃ catunnaṃ vesārajjānaṃ catunnaṃ paṭisambhidānaṃ channaṃ abhiññānaṃ channaṃ buddhadhammānanti bhagavā, bhagavāti netaṃ nāmaṃ mātarā kataṃ na pitarā kataṃ na bhātarā kataṃ na bhaginiyā kataṃ na mittāmaccehi kataṃ na ñātisālohitehi kataṃ na samaṇabrāhmaṇehi kataṃ na devatāhi kataṃ; vimokkhantikametaṃ buddhānaṃ bhagavantānaṃ bodhiyā mūle saha sabbaññutaññāṇassa paṭilābhā sacchikā paññatti yadidaṃ bhagavāti — na kappiyo nūparato na patthiyo iti bhagavā.
KN Nidd I, 14. tuvaṭṭakasuttaniddeso, para. 23 ⇒
bhagavāti gāravādhivacanaṃ. api ca bhaggarāgoti bhagavā, bhaggadosoti bhagavā, bhaggamohoti bhagavā, bhaggamānoti bhagavā, bhaggadiṭṭhīti bhagavā, bhaggakaṇḍakoti bhagavā, bhaggakilesoti bhagavā, bhaji vibhaji pavibhaji dhammaratananti bhagavā, bhavānaṃ antakaroti bhagavā, bhāvitakāyo bhāvitasīlo bhāvitacitto bhāvitapaññoti bhagavā; bhāgī vā bhagavā araññavanapatthāni pantāni senāsanāni appasaddāni appanigghosāni vijanavātāni manussarāhasseyyakāni paṭisallānasāruppānīti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā cīvarapiṇḍapātasenāsanagilānapaccayabhesajjaparikkhārānanti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā attharasassa dhammarasassa vimuttirasassa adhisīlassa adhicittassa adhipaññāyāti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā catunnaṃ jhānānaṃ catunnaṃ appamaññānaṃ catunnaṃ arūpasamāpattīnanti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā aṭṭhannaṃ vimokkhānaṃ aṭṭhannaṃ abhibhāyatanānaṃ navannaṃ anupubbavihārasamāpattīnanti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā dasannaṃ saññābhāvanānaṃ dasannaṃ kasiṇasamāpattīnaṃ ānāpānassatisamādhissa asubhasamāpattiyāti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā catunnaṃ satipaṭṭhānānaṃ catunnaṃ sammappadhānānaṃ catunnaṃ iddhipādānaṃ pañcannaṃ indriyānaṃ pañcannaṃ balānaṃ sattannaṃ bojjhaṅgānaṃ ariyassa aṭṭhaṅgikassa maggassāti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā dasannaṃ tathāgatabalānaṃ catunnaṃ vesārajjānaṃ catunnaṃ paṭisambhidānaṃ channaṃ abhiññānaṃ channaṃ buddhadhammānanti bhagavā, bhagavāti netaṃ nāmaṃ mātarā kataṃ na pitarā kataṃ na bhātarā kataṃ na bhaginiyā kataṃ na mittāmaccehi kataṃ na ñātisālohitehi kataṃ na samaṇabrāhmaṇehi kataṃ na devatāhi kataṃ; vimokkhantikametaṃ buddhānaṃ bhagavantānaṃ bodhiyā mūle saha sabbaññutañāṇassa paṭilābhā sacchikā paññatti yadidaṃ bhagavāti — mūlaṃ papañcasaṅkhāya iti bhagavā.
KN Nidd I, 16. sāriputtasuttaniddeso, para. 199 ⇒
sāriputtāti bhagavāti. taṃ theraṃ nāmenālapati. bhagavāti gāravādhivacanaṃ. api ca bhaggarāgoti bhagavā, bhaggadosoti bhagavā, bhaggamohoti bhagavā, bhaggamānoti bhagavā, bhaggadiṭṭhīti bhagavā, bhaggakaṇḍakoti bhagavā, bhaggakilesoti bhagavā, bhaji vibhaji pavibhaji dhammaratananti bhagavā, bhavānaṃ antakaroti bhagavā, bhāvitakāyo bhāvitasīlo bhāvitacitto bhāvitapaññoti bhagavā; bhaji vā bhagavā araññavanapatthāni pantāni senāsanāni appasaddāni appanigghosāni vijanavātāni manussarāhasseyyakāni paṭisallānasāruppānīti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā cīvarapiṇḍapātasenāsanagilānapaccayabhesajjaparikkhārānanti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā attharasassa dhammarasassa vimuttirasassa adhisīlassa adhicittassa adhipaññāyāti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā catunnaṃ jhānānaṃ catunnaṃ appamaññānaṃ catunnaṃ āruppasamāpattīnanti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā aṭṭhannaṃ vimokkhānaṃ aṭṭhannaṃ abhiññāyatanānaṃ navannaṃ anupubbavihārasamāpattīnanti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā dasannaṃ saññābhāvanānaṃ dasannaṃ kasiṇasamāpattīnaṃ ānāpānassatisamādhissa asubhasamāpattiyāti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā catunnaṃ satipaṭṭhānānaṃ catunnaṃ sammappadhānānaṃ catunnaṃ iddhipādānaṃ pañcannaṃ indriyānaṃ pañcannaṃ balānaṃ sattannaṃ bojjhaṅgānaṃ ariyassa aṭṭhaṅgikassa maggassāti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā dasannaṃ tathāgatabalānaṃ catunnaṃ vesārajjānaṃ catunnaṃ paṭisambhidānaṃ channaṃ abhiññānaṃ channaṃ buddhadhammānanti bhagavā; bhagavāti netaṃ nāmaṃ mātarā kataṃ, na pitarā kataṃ, na bhātarā kataṃ, na bhaginiyā kataṃ, na mittāmaccehi kataṃ, na ñātisālohitehi kataṃ, na samaṇabrāhmaṇehi kataṃ, na devatāhi kataṃ; vimokkhantikametaṃ buddhānaṃ bhagavantānaṃ bodhiyā mūle saha sabbaññutañāṇassa paṭilābhā sacchikā paññatti yadidaṃ bhagavāti — sāriputtāti bhagavā.
KN Nidd I, 16. sāriputtasuttaniddeso, para. 388 ⇒
bhagavāti gāravādhivacanaṃ. api ca bhaggarāgoti bhagavā, bhaggadosoti bhagavā, bhaggamohoti bhagavā, bhaggamānoti bhagavā, bhaggadiṭṭhīti bhagavā, bhaggakaṇḍakoti bhagavā, bhaggakilesoti bhagavā, bhaji vibhaji pavibhaji dhammaratananti bhagavā, bhavānaṃ antakaroti bhagavā, bhāvitakāyo bhāvitasīlo bhāvitacitto bhāvitapaññoti bhagavā, bhaji vā bhagavā araññavanapatthāni pantāni senāsanāni appasaddāni appanigghosāni vijanavātāni manussarāhasseyyakāni paṭisallānasāruppānīti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā cīvarapiṇḍapātasenāsanagilānapaccayabhesajjaparikkhārānanti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā attharasassa dhammarasassa vimuttirasassa adhisīlassa adhicittassa adhipaññāyāti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā catunnaṃ jhānānaṃ catunnaṃ appamaññānaṃ catunnaṃ arūpasamāpattīnanti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā aṭṭhannaṃ vimokkhānaṃ aṭṭhannaṃ abhibhāyatanānaṃ navannaṃ anupubbavihārasamāpattīnanti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā dasannaṃ saññābhāvanānaṃ dasannaṃ kasiṇasamāpattīnaṃ ānāpānassatisamādhissa asubhasamāpattiyāti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā catunnaṃ satipaṭṭhānānaṃ catunnaṃ sammappadhānānaṃ catunnaṃ iddhipādānaṃ pañcannaṃ indriyānaṃ pañcannaṃ balānaṃ sattannaṃ bojjhaṅgānaṃ ariyassa aṭṭhaṅgikassa maggassāti bhagavā, bhāgī vā bhagavā dasannaṃ tathāgatabalānaṃ catunnaṃ vesārajjānaṃ catunnaṃ paṭisambhidānaṃ channaṃ abhiññānaṃ channaṃ buddhadhammānanti bhagavā, bhagavāti netaṃ nāmaṃ mātarā kataṃ na pitarā kataṃ na bhātarā kataṃ na bhaginiyā kataṃ na mittāmaccehi kataṃ na ñātisālohitehi kataṃ na samaṇabrāhmaṇehi kataṃ na devatāhi kataṃ; vimokkhantikametaṃ buddhānaṃ bhagavantānaṃ bodhiyā mūle saha sabbaññutañāṇassa paṭilābhā sacchikā paññatti yadidaṃ bhagavāti — ekodibhūto vihane tamaṃ so iti bhagavā.
KN Nidd II, pārāyanavaggo, pārāyanavagganiddeso, 1. ajitamāṇavapucchāniddeso, para. 19 ⇒
ajitāti bhagavā taṃ brāhmaṇaṃ nāmena ālapati. bhagavāti gāravādhivacanaṃ. api ca, bhaggarāgoti bhagavā; bhaggadosoti bhagavā; bhaggamohoti bhagavā; bhaggamānoti bhagavā; bhaggadiṭṭhīti bhagavā; bhaggakaṇṭakoti bhagavā; bhaggakilesoti bhagavā; bhaji vibhaji pavibhaji dhammaratananti bhagavā; bhavānaṃ antakaroti bhagavā; bhāvitakāyo bhāvitasīlo bhāvitacitto bhāvitapaññoti bhagavā; bhaji vā bhagavā araññavanapatthāni pantāni senāsanāni appasaddāni appanigghosāni vijanavātāni manussarāhasseyyakāni paṭisallānasāruppānīti bhagavā; bhāgī vā bhagavā cīvarapiṇḍapātasenāsanagilānapaccayabhesajjaparikkhārānanti bhagavā; bhāgī vā bhagavā attharasassa dhammarasassa vimuttirasassa adhisīlassa adhicittassa adhipaññāyāti bhagavā; bhāgī vā bhagavā catunnaṃ jhānānaṃ catunnaṃ appamaññānaṃ catunnaṃ arūpasamāpattīnanti bhagavā; bhāgī vā bhagavā aṭṭhannaṃ vimokkhānaṃ aṭṭhannaṃ abhibhāyatanānaṃ navannaṃ anupubbasamāpattīnanti bhagavā; bhāgī vā bhagavā dasannaṃ saññābhāvanānaṃ kasiṇasamāpattīnaṃ ānāpānassatisamādhissa asubhasamāpattiyāti bhagavā; bhāgī vā bhagavā catunnaṃ satipaṭṭhānānaṃ catunnaṃ sammappadhānānaṃ catunnaṃ iddhipādānaṃ pañcannaṃ indriyānaṃ pañcannaṃ balānaṃ sattannaṃ bojjhaṅgānaṃ ariyassa aṭṭhaṅgikassa maggassāti bhagavā; bhāgī vā bhagavā dasannaṃ tathāgatabalānaṃ catunnaṃ vesārajjānaṃ catunnaṃ paṭisambhidānaṃ channaṃ abhiññānaṃ channaṃ buddhadhammānanti bhagavā; bhagavāti netaṃ nāmaṃ mātarā kataṃ na pitarā kataṃ na bhātarā kataṃ na bhaginiyā kataṃ na mittāmaccehi kataṃ na ñātisālohitehi kataṃ na samaṇabrāhmaṇehi kataṃ na devatāhi kataṃ. vimokkhantikametaṃ buddhānaṃ bhagavantānaṃ bodhiyā mūle saha sabbaññutañāṇassa paṭilābhā sacchikā paññatti, yadidaṃ bhagavāti — ajitāti bhagavā.
KN Paṭis, 1. mahāvaggo, 1. ñāṇakathā, 1. sutamayañāṇaniddeso, para. 24 ⇒
pathavīkasiṇaṃ abhiññeyyaṃ; āpokasiṇaṃ abhiññeyyaṃ; tejokasiṇaṃ abhiññeyyaṃ; vāyokasiṇaṃ abhiññeyyaṃ; nīlakasiṇaṃ abhiññeyyaṃ; pītakasiṇaṃ abhiññeyyaṃ; lohitakasiṇaṃ abhiññeyyaṃ; odātakasiṇaṃ abhiññeyyaṃ; ākāsakasiṇaṃ abhiññeyyaṃ; viññāṇakasiṇaṃ abhiññeyyaṃ.
KN Paṭis, 1. mahāvaggo, 1. ñāṇakathā, 3. samādhibhāvanāmayañāṇaniddeso, para. 2 ⇒
cha samādhī — buddhānussativasena cittassa ekaggatā avikkhepo samādhi, dhammānussativasena cittassa ekaggatā avikkhepo samādhi, saṅghānussativasena cittassa ekaggatā avikkhepo samādhi, sīlānussativasena cittassa ekaggatā avikkhepo samādhi, cāgānussativasena cittassa ekaggatā avikkhepo samādhi, devatānussativasena cittassa ekaggatā avikkhepo samādhi. satta samādhī — samādhikusalatā, samādhissa samāpattikusalatā, samādhissa ṭhitikusalatā, samādhissa vuṭṭhānakusalatā, samādhissa kallatākusalatā, samādhissa gocarakusalatā, samādhissa abhinīhārakusalatā. aṭṭha samādhī — pathavīkasiṇavasena cittassa ekaggatā avikkhepo samādhi, āpokasiṇavasena . pe . tejokasiṇavasena. vāyokasiṇavasena. nīlakasiṇavasena. pītakasiṇavasena. lohitakasiṇavasena. odātakasiṇavasena cittassa ekaggatā avikkhepo samādhi. nava samādhī — rūpāvacaro samādhi atthi hīno, atthi majjhomo, atthi paṇīto; arūpāvacaro samādhi atthi hīno, atthi majjhomo, atthi paṇīto; suññato samādhi, animitto samādhi, appaṇihito samādhi. dasa samādhī — uddhumātakasaññāvasena cittassa ekaggatā avikkhepo samādhi, vinīlakasaññāvasena . pe . vipubbakasaññāvasena. vicchiddakasaññāvasena. vikkhāyitakasaññāvasena. vikkhittakasaññāvasena. hatavikkhittakasaññāvasena. lohitakasaññāvasena. puḷavakasaññāvasena . aṭṭhikasaññāvasena cittassa ekaggatā avikkhepo samādhi. ime pañcapaññāsa samādhi.
KN Paṭis, 1. mahāvaggo, 1. ñāṇakathā, 32. ānantarikasamādhiñāṇaniddeso, para. 3 ⇒
abyāpādavasena . pe . ālokasaññāvasena. avikkhepavasena. dhammavavatthānavasena. ñāṇavasena. pāmojjavasena. paṭhamajjhānavasena. dutiyajjhānavasena. tatiyajjhānavasena. catutthajjhānavasena. ākāsānañcāyatanasamāpattivasena. viññāṇañcāyatanasamāpattivasena. ākiñcaññāyatanasamāpattivasena. nevasaññānāsaññāyatanasamāpattivasena. pathavīkasiṇavasena. āpokasiṇavasena . tejokasiṇavasena. vāyokasiṇavasena. nīlakasiṇavasena. pītakasiṇavasena. lohitakasiṇavasena. odātakasiṇavasena. ākāsakasiṇavasena. viññāṇakasiṇavasena. buddhānussativasena. dhammānussativasena. saṅghānussativasena. sīlānussativasena. cāgānussativasena. devatānussativasena. ānāpānassativasena. maraṇassativasena. kāyagatāsativasena. upasamānussativasena. uddhumātakasaññāvasena. vinīlakasaññāvasena. vipubbakasaññāvasena. vicchiddakasaññāvasena. vikkhāyitakasaññāvasena. vikkhittakasaññāvasena. hatavikkhittakasaññāvasena . lohitakasaññāvasena. puḷavakasaññāvasena. aṭṭhikasaññāvasena.
KN Paṭis, 1. mahāvaggo, 2. diṭṭhikathā, , para. 5 ⇒
pathavīdhātuṃ etaṃ mama . pe . āpodhātuṃ etaṃ mama. tejodhātuṃ etaṃ mama. vāyodhātuṃ etaṃ mama. ākāsadhātuṃ etaṃ mama. viññāṇadhātuṃ etaṃ mama, esohamasmi, eso me attāti — abhinivesaparāmāso diṭṭhi. pathavīkasiṇaṃ etaṃ mama . pe . āpokasiṇaṃ. tejokasiṇaṃ. vāyokasiṇaṃ . nīlakasiṇaṃ. pītakasiṇaṃ. lohitakasiṇaṃ. odātakasiṇaṃ. ākāsakasiṇaṃ. viññāṇakasiṇaṃ etaṃ mama, esohamasmi, eso me attāti — abhinivesaparāmāso diṭṭhi.
KN Paṭis, 1. mahāvaggo, 2. diṭṭhikathā, 2. attānudiṭṭhiniddeso, para. 2 ⇒
131. kathaṃ rūpaṃ attato samanupassati? idhekacco pathavīkasiṇaṃ attato samanupassati — “yaṃ pathavīkasiṇaṃ, so ahaṃ; yo ahaṃ, taṃ pathavīkasiṇan””ti. pathavīkasiṇañca attañca advayaṃ samanupassati. seyyathāpi telappadīpassa jhāyato “yā acci so vaṇṇo, yo vaṇṇo sā accī”ti — acciñca vaṇṇañca advayaṃ samanupassati. evamevaṃ idhekacco pathavīkasiṇaṃ attato samanupassati — “yaṃ pathavīkasiṇaṃ, so ahaṃ; yo ahaṃ, taṃ pathavīkasiṇan””ti. pathavīkasiṇañca attañca advayaṃ samanupassati. abhinivesaparāmāso diṭṭhi. diṭṭhi na vatthu, vatthu na diṭṭhi. aññā diṭṭhi, aññaṃ vatthu. yā ca diṭṭhi yañca vatthu — ayaṃ paṭhamā rūpavatthukā attānudiṭṭhi. attānudiṭṭhi micchādiṭṭhi diṭṭhivipatti . pe . attānudiṭṭhi micchādiṭṭhi. micchādiṭṭhikassa purisapuggalassa dveva gatiyo . pe . imāni saññojanāni, na ca diṭṭhiyo.
KN Paṭis, 1. mahāvaggo, 2. diṭṭhikathā, 2. attānudiṭṭhiniddeso, para. 3 ⇒
idhekacco āpokasiṇaṃ. tejokasiṇaṃ. vāyokasiṇaṃ. nīlakasiṇaṃ. pītakasiṇaṃ. lohitakasiṇaṃ. odātakasiṇaṃ attato samanupassati — “yaṃ odātakasiṇaṃ, so ahaṃ; yo ahaṃ, taṃ odātakasiṇan””ti. odātakasiṇañca attañca advayaṃ samanupassati. seyyathāpi telappadīpassa jhāyato “yā acci, so vaṇṇo; yo vaṇṇo, sā accī”ti — acciñca vaṇṇañca advayaṃ samanupassati. evameva idhekacco . pe . odātakasiṇañca attañca advayaṃ samanupassati. abhinivesaparāmāso diṭṭhi. diṭṭhi na vatthu, vatthu na diṭṭhi. aññā diṭṭhi, aññaṃ vatthu. yā ca diṭṭhi yañca vatthu — ayaṃ paṭhamā rūpavatthukā attānudiṭṭhi. attānudiṭṭhi micchādiṭṭhi diṭṭhivipatti . pe . imāni saññojanāni, na ca diṭṭhiyo. evaṃ rūpaṃ attato samanupassati.
KN Paṭis, 1. mahāvaggo, 2. diṭṭhikathā, 4. sakkāyadiṭṭhiniddeso, para. 2 ⇒
kathaṃ rūpaṃ attato samanupassati? idhekacco pathavīkasiṇaṃ . pe . odātakasiṇaṃ attato samanupassati. “yaṃ odātakasiṇaṃ, so ahaṃ; yo ahaṃ, taṃ odātakasiṇan””ti — odātakasiṇañca attañca advayaṃ samanupassati . seyyathāpi telappadīpassa jhāyato . pe . evamevaṃ idhekacco odātakasiṇaṃ attato samanupassati. abhinivesaparāmāso diṭṭhi . pe . ayaṃ paṭhamā rūpavatthukā sakkāyadiṭṭhi. sakkāyadiṭṭhi micchādiṭṭhi . pe . imāni saññojanāni, na ca diṭṭhiyo. evaṃ rūpaṃ attato samanupassati . pe . sakkāyadiṭṭhiyā imehi vīsatiyā ākārehi abhiniveso hoti.
KN Paṭis, 1. mahāvaggo, 2. diṭṭhikathā, 6. ucchedadiṭṭhiniddeso, para. 2 ⇒
kathaṃ rūpaṃ attato samanupassati? idhekacco pathavīkasiṇaṃ . pe . odātakasiṇaṃ attato samanupassati. “yaṃ odātakasiṇaṃ, so ahaṃ; yo ahaṃ, taṃ odātakasiṇan””ti — odātakasiṇañca attañca advayaṃ samanupassati. seyyathāpi telappadīpassa jhāyato . pe . ayaṃ paṭhamā sakkāyavatthukā ucchedadiṭṭhi. ucchedadiṭṭhi micchādiṭṭhi . pe . imāni saññojanāni, na ca diṭṭhiyo. evaṃ rūpaṃ attato samanupassati . pe . sakkāyavatthukāya ucchedadiṭṭhiyā imehi pañcahi ākārehi abhiniveso hoti.
KN Paṭis, 1. mahāvaggo, 2. diṭṭhikathā, 13. attavādapaṭisaṃyuttadiṭṭhiniddeso, para. 2 ⇒
kathaṃ rūpaṃ attato samanupassati? idhekacco pathavīkasiṇaṃ . pe . odātakasiṇaṃ attato samanupassati. “yaṃ odātakasiṇaṃ, so ahaṃ; yo ahaṃ, taṃ odātakasiṇan””ti — odātakasiṇañca attañca advayaṃ samanupassati. seyyathāpi telappadīpassa jhāyato “yā acci, so vaṇṇo; yo vaṇṇo, sā accī”ti — acciñca vaṇṇañca advayaṃ samanupassati. evamevaṃ idhekacco odātakasiṇaṃ attato samanupassati . pe . ayaṃ paṭhamā rūpavatthukā attavādapaṭisaṃyuttā diṭṭhi. attavādapaṭisaṃyuttā diṭṭhi micchādiṭṭhi . pe . imāni saññojanāni, na ca diṭṭhiyo. evaṃ rūpaṃ attato samanupassati . pe . attavādapaṭisaṃyuttāya diṭṭhiyā imehi vīsatiyā ākārehi abhiniveso hoti.
KN Paṭis, 3. paññāvaggo, 2. iddhikathā, dasaiddhiniddeso, para. 3 ⇒
11. āvibhāvanti kenaci anāvaṭaṃ hoti appaṭicchannaṃ vivaṭaṃ pākaṭaṃ. tirobhāvanti kenaci āvaṭaṃ hoti paṭicchannaṃ pihitaṃ paṭikujjitaṃ. tirokuṭṭaṃ tiropākāraṃ tiropabbataṃ asajjamāno gacchati, seyyathāpi ākāseti pakatiyā ākāsakasiṇasamāpattiyā lābhī hoti. tirokuṭṭaṃ tiropākāraṃ tiropabbataṃ āvajjati. āvajjitvā ñāṇena adhiṭṭhāti — “ākāso hotū”ti. ākāso hoti. tirokuṭṭaṃ tiropākāraṃ tiropabbataṃ asajjamāno gacchati. yathā manussā pakatiyā aniddhimanto kenaci anāvaṭe aparikkhitte asajjamānā gacchanti, evamevaṃ so iddhimā cetovasippatto tirokuṭṭaṃ tiropākāraṃ tiropabbataṃ asajjamāno gacchati, seyyathāpi ākāse.
KN Paṭis, 3. paññāvaggo, 2. iddhikathā, dasaiddhiniddeso, para. 4 ⇒
pathaviyāpi ummujjanimujjaṃ karoti, seyyathāpi udaketi pakatiyā āpokasiṇasamāpattiyā lābhī hoti. pathaviṃ āvajjati. āvajjitvā ñāṇena adhiṭṭhāti — “udakaṃ hotū”ti. udakaṃ hoti. so pathaviyā ummujjanimujjaṃ karoti. yathā manussā pakatiyā aniddhimanto udake ummujjanimujjaṃ karonti, evamevaṃ so iddhimā cetovasippatto pathaviyā ummujjanimujjaṃ karoti, seyyathāpi udake.
KN Paṭis, 3. paññāvaggo, 2. iddhikathā, dasaiddhiniddeso, para. 5 ⇒
udakepi abhijjamāne gacchati, seyyathāpi pathaviyanti pakatiyā pathavīkasiṇasamāpattiyā lābhī hoti. udakaṃ āvajjati. āvajjitvā ñāṇena adhiṭṭhāti — “pathavī hotū”ti. pathavī hoti. so abhijjamāne udake gacchati. yathā manussā pakatiyā aniddhimanto abhijjamānāya pathaviyā gacchanti, evamevaṃ so iddhimā cetovasippatto abhijjamāne udake gacchati, seyyathāpi pathaviyaṃ.
KN Paṭis, 3. paññāvaggo, 2. iddhikathā, dasaiddhiniddeso, para. 6 ⇒
ākāsepi pallaṅkena kamati, seyyathāpi pakkhī sakuṇoti pakatiyā pathavīkasiṇasamāpattiyā lābhī hoti. ākāsaṃ āvajjati . āvajjitvā ñāṇena adhiṭṭhāti — “pathavī hotū”ti. pathavī hoti. so ākāse antalikkhe caṅkamatipi tiṭṭhatipi nisīdatipi seyyampi kappeti. yathā manussā pakatiyā aniddhimanto pathaviyā caṅkamantipi tiṭṭhantipi nisīdantipi seyyampi kappenti, evamevaṃ so iddhimā cetovasippatto ākāse antalikkhe caṅkamatipi tiṭṭhatipi nisīdatipi seyyampi kappeti, seyyathāpi pakkhī sakuṇo.
KN Nett, 4. paṭiniddesavāro, 2. vicayahārasampāto, para. 6 ⇒
55. dasa kasiṇāyatanāni pathavīkasiṇaṃ āpokasiṇaṃ tejokasiṇaṃ vāyokasiṇaṃ nīlakasiṇaṃ pītakasiṇaṃ lohitakasiṇaṃ odātakasiṇaṃ ākāsakasiṇaṃ viññāṇakasiṇaṃ. tattha yañca pathavīkasiṇaṃ yañca āpokasiṇaṃ evaṃ sabbaṃ, yañca odātakasiṇaṃ. imāni aṭṭha kasiṇāni samatho. yañca ākāsakasiṇaṃ yañca viññāṇakasiṇaṃ, ayaṃ vipassanā. evaṃ sabbo ariyo maggo yena yena ākārena vutto, tena tena samathavipassanena yojayitabbo. te tīhi dhammehi saṅgahitā aniccatāya dukkhatāya anattatāya. so samathavipassanaṃ bhāvayamāno tīṇi vimokkhamukhāni bhāvayati. tīṇi vimokkhamukhāni bhāvayanto tayo khandhe bhāvayati. tayo khandhe bhāvayanto ariyaṃ aṭṭhaṅgikaṃ maggaṃ bhāvayati.

21st century explanation by Thitapuñño Bhikkhu

.
.
Colour-Kasina Meditation
By Thitapuñño Bhikkhu
Introduction
Kasina objects (kasina meaning “all, complete, whole”) are among the meditation subjects recommended by the Buddha that are suitable for developing concentration conducive to the four absorptions (jhana).1 For a number of reasons meditation practice using kasina objects has not been very popular in the West. One of the reasons may be that the method is not amenable to be taught in groups – as is ordinarily done in meditation retreats. Kasina meditation requires that each meditator use their own kasina device and their surrounding environment must be free from visual stimulants. Another reason may be that it is not easy to find qualified teachers who have had experience with the method. Unfortunately information on this method of practice is limited and often vague also. Furthermore, some teachers discourage the practice of kasina meditation on the grounds that it is psychologically dangerous. This is an unjustified notion, although as with any kind of meditation practice a teacher should closely supervise students practicing kasina methods.2
Colour-kasina meditation may prove to be very useful for some meditators who have found limited success using the breath or other subjects of meditation. Like any meditation subject or method there are advantages and disadvantages to kasina practice. Among its advantages, the colour-kasina meditation object has the quality of being clearly defined in terms of its size, texture, and optical resolution (since it is a visual object), whereas the breath, likely the most common meditation subject, is a tactile object that is harder to define initially due to its “fuzzy” quality. Indeed, as meditators deepen their mindfulness and concentration in a particular sitting, the kasina object will appear to be clearer and more well-defined. In the case of the breath, however, as one gains more serenity the object becomes more subtle and is harder to apprehend. This is not a disadvantage of breath meditation per se, since its very demand for higher mindfulness and concentration stimulates the development of these faculties. But for a beginner it may be easier to grasp a very concrete object such as a colour-kasina during the initial stages of development. During the development of serenity using kasina devices, the gradual improvement in mindfulness and concentration become evident by the emergence of clear signs (visual and/or mental) called nimitta that mark definite stages of the process. During practice, these nimitta, or “signs,” facilitate the meditator’s assessment of progress by establishing clear reference points. One drawback to the practice is that kasina devices have to be made and are cumbersome to store and transport. The main drawback of kasina meditation is that it may place excessive strain on the eyes in some individuals, giving rise to eye irritation or fatigue. One should try, within reason, not to discontinue the practice if problems of this nature arise, although relief will normally occur during the regular intervals (or longer periods) during which the eyes are closed. In any case, bear in mind that ordinarily meditators have to put up with aches and pains over long periods of time as they develop their regular sitting practice.

Basic Instruction

The following instructions are given in brief and include some aspects not mentioned in the classical texts. However, meditators are advised to consult available texts that deal with points not mentioned in this article.3 Initially one should find and consult a teacher with experience in kasina meditation, then one should prepare one or several kasina devices (see instructions at the end of this article), and seek a suitable place for practicing. The area of practice must be quiet and well-lit. One must make sure the practice area is also clean and tidy. The background against which the kasina device is placed must not be cluttered or show visually-distracting features. One’s sitting posture must be comfortable (any arrangement of the legs/arms will do as long as the back is self-supported and straight). The image should be imprinted on a suitable surface such as a plate. Usually a coloured or white circle with a black border centred on a square white surface will do (squares, triangles or other regular polygons could be used as suitable images, as well).
The kasina device should be placed between 1.5 and 3 meters away from the eyes. One then stares at the centre of the coloured image without considering the border or the remaining white area. One may blink one’s eyes to relieve them of tension or fatigue. Focusing on the colour one may initially repeat to oneself (mantra-like) the corresponding name of the colour (e.g. “blue, blue, …”) for a short while until the initial focus on the object has been established and one is increasingly less distracted. Then all verbalization is abandoned and one focuses exclusively on the “blueness,” with firm intent to subdue or keep at bay other thoughts or sensory experiences.
The time one should spend practising kasina meditation varies from person to person. In general terms one would spend as much time as one ordinarily invests in developing any other meditation subject. One must stare at the kasina object continuously for several minutes, or sometimes more than one hour, in order to acquire a strong retinal image. This will appear as a persistent “complementary” or “negative” image imprinted on the retina that manifests when closing the eyes. For instance, when one uses a blue kasina the retinal image appears as a yellow or orangey-yellow image with the black border appearing as a brightly “lit” whitish ring. The background will appear as a dark shadow, further enhancing the brightness of the retinal image by effect of contrast. When signs of visual fatigue manifest, one should mindfully close one’s eyes. With eyes now closed, and without the slightest interruption in the train of attention, one should continue to focus on the (virtual) retinal image that has arisen from gazing at the coloured physical image. To a large extent, the clear definition and intensity of the retinal-image generated depends on the degree of mindfulness and concentration exercised. The appearance of other signs or nimittas, described below, may take days, weeks, months or years depending on the individual practitioner, but the retinal image always appears after a short period of staring at the object.
The retinal image will naturally remain present for a few seconds or minutes and will then start to fade. At this point one usually opens one’s eyes and again gazes at the working image without a break in focus. On occasions one may notice that if the eyes remain closed, the retinal image may disappear for a brief moment only to reappear in attenuated form after a few seconds. The cycle whereby the image appears and disappears may repeat itself a few more times. One may use these faded images as objects of focus. The advantage of doing so is that the mind tries to enhance the elements that are slowly fading out. Thus, after many months or years of practice the mind may generate the image solely by visualization, no longer requiring physical prompting.
There will be occasions when the mind will experience the hindrance of lethargy and torpor, making it hard to sustain one’s attention on the physical object. In this case, after some time of focusing on, say, the blue kasina, one may quickly turn the device around and focus on the yellow kasina. (This is one of the reasons why it is suggested that these two images be created back to back on a suitable surface: see below.) The yellow circle on the newly presented physical image will then show itself highly enhanced in brightness and definition. This occurs because the yellow physical image is, so to speak, being “amplified” by the retinal counter-image of blue – which is also yellow. The effect tends to rekindle one’s interest in and sustained attention upon the object and in so doing dispels any lethargy and torpor once present. Meditators may try this trick whenever interest in the object wanes.
As one advances in the practice over days, weeks or months, one may notice that the mind stabilizes and is able to maintain a lucid attention on the object for longer periods. At some point the meditator may find that the retinal image is so strongly infused by such attention that it will start to “overlap” with the direct visual perception of the physical image. Occasionally the practitioner may find that what used to be the white background area surrounding the object acquires a light tone corresponding to the colour of the main (kasina) object. The meditator may even feel that the surrounding area has turned into the colour of the object. Since the retinal image is the “negative” of the physical image, the “overlap” will result in the effective disappearance of the physical image – even while one continues, open-eyed, to stare at it. This gives rise to a new kind of image which is actually dark black (a dark shadow; we may call this nimitta the “eclipsed” image).4 At this crucial point the meditator must not slacken effort but must continue striving to sharpen the focus of attention on the new nimitta.5
If one is able to sustain one’s effort, this “eclipsed” image will eventually – and some times quite suddenly – disappear, giving rise to a remarkably bright image (known as the “counterpart sign”).6 This image will show itself with remarkable brightness akin to the disk of the full moon or the sun’s disk (assuming the kasina object used is circular), as seen on a hazy or foggy day. When it appears, this bright and perfectly uniform mental image marks the entrance into access- or neighbourhood-concentration. In access concentration the mind is temporarily free from the mental hindrances and will experience a level of stability, calm and satisfaction superior to the ordinary waking state. The stage may now be set to achieve the strong serenity levels of jhana or “fixed penetration” (appana-samadhi).
The practitioner must strive to sustain the access concentration state for as long as possible. One must not rest content with the initial, momentary success which has been achieved by generating the counterpart image – as it may be very difficult to reproduce the result at a later session. During these elusive and sporadic periods of attainment, effort must be made to reproduce it as many times as possible – especially during the same sitting session. At this stage one must strive to develop one’s level of proficiency by guarding the ability to generate the counterpart sign. This means that one must be careful not to indulge in distractions or be careless in one’s purity of deed, word and thought; one must also guard the sense-doors, be moderate in eating, mindful and self possessed, and must aspire with perseverance to eliminate the hindrances and maintain concentration. The need for continued practice is important in order to stabilize the attainment. When the kasina object is mastered completely, the meditator should be able to generate the counterpart sign without requiring the use of a physical object. At the stage of mastery the meditator should also be able to modulate the size of the nimitta at will (as is described in the texts).3a, b, d
With such mastery of the kasina the meditator may remain in the stillness of the concentrated state for long periods of time and pursue further progress in the development of serenity. If the meditator has subsequently mastered the attainment of first jhana (as described in the commentarial texts) he/she may pursue the development towards the quiet and stillness of the second jhana. At this stage all discursive thought has ceased and volitional impulses will be almost entirely suppressed, yet the potential will remain at hand to let go of the remaining jhanic factors, leading the mind to the remaining material jhana states.7
The ultimate benefit of these attainments is that the profound stillness they engender offers the practitioner the most suitable conditions to attempt, in a systematic manner, to gain insight knowledge. In this next stage of development, as soon as the mind exits the concentration state and begins to take up any object (pre-determined or not), it must thoroughly examine that object reflectively in the light of any of the three characteristics of existence: impermanence, unsatisfactoriness, or not-self. This sequence of events is commonly known as the “development of insight preceded by serenity.” Having set out in brief this description of the kasina method, however, we will not take up this topic here.

Preparation of a Kasina device

Preparation of the kasina device must be carried out with great care and attention. Since the device is an important element conducive to insight and concentration it must be treated carefully and should always be kept and placed in appropriate spots where risk of damage is minimized. It must not be treated as an ordinary object or tool. It is a good idea to prepare and try to practice with the four traditional kasina colours: white, yellow, red and blue.8
Suggested dimensions:
Coloured circle diameter = 9”
Circle centred on square of side = 27”
Black border for circle, thickness = (a generous) 3/4”
These measurements are derived from the standard 9 inch diameter circle described in the texts. The square side length for the plate or flat surface (plywood or other suitable rigid material) is obtained by multiplying 9 inches by 1.618 (the golden ratio or golden proportion) 3 times and dividing the product by the square root of 2. The border thickness (actually .81”) results from dividing 9 inches by 1.618 (5 times). Creating the device based on these proportions results in a harmonious-looking figure that is pleasing to the eye.
Initially, you can try indigo blue on one side of the plate and a vivid, school bus yellow for the figure on the other side. Acrylic paint, or other suitable media, subsequently coated with glossy lacquer for the circle and border (leaving the white surface non-glossy) works very well. The fewer irregularities in the coloured image and border, and the less texture coarseness in the kasina surface, the better – particularly if the device is intended for use by a beginner.
Notes
1) See for example: a) Mahasakuludayi Sutta (Majjhima Nikaya,77), in The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha, trans. Bhikkhu Ñanamoli and Bhikkhu Bodhi, Wisdom Publications: Boston, 1995; see also: www.saigon.com/~anson/ebud/majjhima/077-mahasakuludayi-e1.htm); b) Sangiti Sutta (Digha Nikaya, 33), in The Long Discourses of the Buddha, trans. Maurice Walshe, Wisdom Publications: Boston,1995.
2) Individuals with a history of psychotic disorders, on medication or treatment for such disorders (including depression) should not practice this type of meditation. If hallucinations or recall of repressed memories manifest in individuals who have never experienced psychotic disorders, they should consult with their teacher as soon as possible.
3) See for example, a) Vimuttimagga (The Path of Freedom) by the Arahant Upatissa, trans. Rev. N.R.M. Ehara, Soma Thera, and Kheminda Thera, pp.124-27, Buddhist Publication Society (BPS): Kandy, Sri Lanka, 1995; b) The Jhanas in Theravada Buddhist Meditation, by Ven. Henepola Gunaratana, BPS; c) “The Mystery of the Breath Nimitta” by Ven. Sona, in http://www.baynet.net/~arcc/dhamma/nimitta.html; d) Visuddhimagga (The Path of Purification) by Ven. Buddhaghossa, III.97, V.12-V20, XIII.95, XVII.143, BPS: Kandy, Sri Lanka.
4) The fading out of the working object at this stage is analogous to the fading away of the characteristic sign of the object in breath meditation – which usually happens as a result of its turning more subtle as the body and mind approach serenity. This would also mark an equivalent stage of serenity development using a kasina object.
5) Individuals of a speculative temperament are advised not to fall into the temptation of jumping to conclusions or try to come up with theories regarding any visual effects experienced in practice.
6) This is what the texts call the counterpart sign or patibhaga-nimitta, which may also be referred to as aloka- kasina (light kasina) when the sign is generated using a colour kasina. In summary, there are four signs (nimitta) to consider in the process of reaching access concentration using the kasina method: 1) The coloured kasina object itself (the “physical” or “working” image); 2) The retinal image (the “negative” visual image of the coloured kasina object); 3) The “eclipsed” image (the dark shadow visual image arising when 1) and 2) neutralize each other); and 4) The bright counterpart sign (a mental image).
7) In a sense, the whole process of developing deep concentration, from beginning to end, is a motion of the mind seeking the characteristics of non-proliferation and non-diversity of perception. Thus, one selects the kasina devise from amongst the myriad of possible objects; then one focuses attention on a particular feature within the main (composite) object; next, focus is directed onto an image which is enhanced and more refined than the original; and then one continues by discerning a more refined single aspect in relation to subsequent visual or mental objects of focus.
8) The choice of a suitable colour to practice with may be determined by the teacher based on the student’s temperament. The commentaries indicate that colour kasinas are particularly suited for greedy temperaments (see Ref. 3d). If the meditator has strong aesthetic inclination towards a particular colour, it may be a good first choice. In general, white would be suitable for most temperaments; yellow has an energizing quality and is a good subject for those who are lethargic or tend to be depressed; blue is suitable for one of greedy or angry temperament due to its cooling quality (but the reason one may use it may be that it also has a refreshing quality when one practises in a hot climate); red is a warm colour that may be suitable for a person who is apathetic or who practices in a cold climate. One may experiment by practising with a particular colour for a few days, then switching to the next for the same number of days, and so on, until one is able to assess by experience what is personally more suitable.
***

I haven’t gone through all of your posts above, but I recall reading a sutta where the meditator is supposed to bear in mind the earth element, as if it were flat, without the details of trees and mountains, etc. It reminded me of the earth kasina and how it is presented. I also recall how some Bhikkhus were able to perform miracles by using the fire element. There is a likely trend in that, some of these practices became more formalized much later acquiring their own labels, such as kasina. Or those terms were in little use during the Buddha’s time but became much more popular in later times. These don’t seem to be very popular practices and perhaps some bhikkhus were much more adept than others, hence instructions to them, perhaps weren’t necessary for general memorization and/or there were equally or more useful methods (such as the breath meditation) to do the same job.

with metta

I think you’re referring to the Cūḷasuññatasutta, MN121.

The commentary to this sutta does in fact equate paṭhavī-saññā with paṭhavī-kasiṇa.

5 Likes

Thanks for the MN 121 reference. That reminds me SN 54.8 dipa sutta, vism. says this part is referring to kasina practice:

SN 54.8 ‘neva me kāyo kilameyya na cakkhūni, {may} neither (my) body be-fatigued, nor (my) eyes; Vism. says eye-fatigue is referring to kasina practice, because one’s eyes get tired staring at colored disks.

I really have a hard time believing the Buddha actually encouraged anyone to practice kasinas in the way Vism. teaches, staring at an object with eyes open, until they have it memorized and can see the object with eyes closed.

At best, if the Buddha did allow kasina practice for those disciples who maybe already learned that from their previous non buddhist teachers, I would think it applied to people’s samadhi were already strong enough that they could see an object with eyes closed already, such as light, or patch of white.

the article I have at the end of notes, says,

Colour-Kasina Meditation

By Thitapuñño Bhikkhu

Introduction

Kasina objects (kasina meaning “all, complete, whole”) are among the meditation subjects recommended by the Buddha that are suitable for developing concentration conducive to the four absorptions (jhana).1

I find it really disturbing that this is the standard orthodox Theravada position, that the Buddha taught and recommended kasina practice.

Unsurprisingly, the kasiṇas find mention in the SA as 一切入處.

SA 109 seems to have a more optimistic assessment of these 'totalities". It really boils down to whether or not the meditator has Right View in relation to the attainment engendered by using these “totalities”.

The passage starts by describing meditators attaining the Form Aggregate by means of the first eight kasiṇas , which then forms the basis for proliferation and clinging to the Aggregates thereof. However, the well-instructed disciple of the Noble Ones regard these things as such -

一切無常、一切苦、一切空、一切非我
All these are impermanent, all these are painful, all these are empty, all these are without self.

These ties back in to the AN 10.26 message about understanding these things in terms of their drawback and escape.

See also 遍處 as an alternative translation of kasiṇa .

5 Likes

I don’t see any reason to distrust them. You say there’s no instruction on how to practice them but it seems pretty self-explanatory. You visualize the kasina. I think it’s unfair & misfounded to be skeptical here.

2 Likes

Thanks first of all for this collection and others as well. In order to make them readable I’d suggest though to make it shorter, for in this format (scrolling) it’s unwieldy and personally the many post-canonical commentaries and the modern interpretation etc. don’t really add to the EBT question…

How do you come to this assessment - what is particularly brahmanic about them? For the brahmins they would have to be either of sacrificial value or for the sake of unification with brahman, and I see neither with the kasinas in the EBT. (the term kṛtsna appears often in Vedic texts though)

They don’t really fit with EBT meditation either because there is not dhamma connected - no dukkha, no impermanence, no development of kusala qualities etc. It’s ‘just’ a technique, like washing the dishes. But as you wrote

The Vism view is not justified by the EBT. From how many of the 10 kasinas mentioned in the suttas can you actually make a colored disc? only four. The others are the full set of 6 dhatus - earth, water, fire, wind, space, consciousness. So suddenly we are in the realm of ‘normal’ extended body contemplation that finds its clearest formulation in MN 62 and MN 140.

So the objects are the properties (as dhatus should be properly translated, no ‘elements’), what kind of properties? measureless, i.e. kasina. And now we have the clear association with at least the first two ‘normal’ measureless ayatanas, i.e. space and consciousness.

What we have then here with the kasinas is
~ a measureless meditation next to the ‘arupa-ayatana’ and the ‘brahmaviharas’
~ the unusual feature of the colors
~ the unusual neighborhood to ayatana as in the revealing MN 102 where non-Buddhists speculate about the consciousness-kasina synonymous with an ayatana, i.e. a home-base of experience

2 Likes

AN 10.26 does suggest that 10 kasinas is something nonbuddhist samanas and brahmins practiced. If 10ksn is genuine EBT, AN 10.26 and 10.29 seem to be trying to subjugate and incorporate it into EBT structure, perhaps similarly to how 4bv was not the Buddha’s discovery but was incorporated into the program.

一切入處

how do you translate that? google translate has “all entry”

I see, but you know that ‘samana-brahmana’ is a generic term for an ambitious spiritual practitioner, including Buddhists. You’re right of course that in the context of AN 10.26 where the passage starts with “Some ascetics and brahmins” it doesn’t mean Buddha’s followers, but there are more direct references to Brahmins as well, so here it would simply mean ‘any-non-Buddha-followers’.

Connected with this is indeed a brahmin concept, i.e. the ‘mahabhuta’ (the great beings) which existed before the Buddha incorporated it. In the pre-Buddhist context they are always five in number (earth, water, fire, wind + space). It might well be (but is just my speculation) that the ‘kasina’ aspect is connected to their ‘maha’ aspect. What I mean is that they were already conceptualized as ‘maha’, great, and also premordial in their cosmogony. Maybe it’s just a small step from conceptualizing them as ‘great’ to ‘complete’ and make an esoteric practice out of it…

It would be far from the only thing that the Buddha incorporated. The idea of karma for example is not of Buddhist origin - which does not mean that it’s not EBT.

3 Likes

This is going to be tough, as it will involve some guesswork that leads to 2 equally plausible answers.

Firstly, 入處 is āyatana.

The tricky part here is whether the SA translators understood 一切 in this sutra as meaning -

(i) the indefinite universal pronoun “everything” or “all”; or
(ii) the proper name “the All”.

The SA shows that both senses pop up. While the former sense is seen quite often, the latter is seen in eg SA 319 (parallel to SN 35.23).

Now, if I’m correct in guessing that the SA translators were thinking of the latter sense of the Upanisadic nominative of label sabbaṃ/sarvaṃ in this sutra, then this points to the kṛtsna being employed by the pre-Buddhists as a means of becoming “the All”.

See what the Buddha recommends in MN 1 on how we should relate to “the All”. Notice how it occupies the penultimate spot just before Nibbana. The problem with these things is the nandi/delight we take in them.

Just as the jhanas can be the object of acquisition as in AN 4.123, so too any other ends achieved by the kṛtsna. It’s really one’s attitude to the attainment that determines whether one generates rebirth or not.

3 Likes

Here are some contexts with kṛtsna in the pre-Buddhist texts. It signifies both a worIdly and a spiritually charged ‘fullness’, ‘completeness’. It only appears once in the proper vedas, but 130 times in the Satapatha Brahmana (SB, which often pops up in connection with content the Buddha references) and a few times in its last portion, the Brhadaranyaka Upanisad. The Chandogya Upanisad doesn’t know it.

  • Taittriya Samhita: Homage to the completely covered, to the running, to the lord of warriors homage!
  • SB 1.3.5.15: …by reciting a complete gayatri (mantra) verse, he automatically bestows complete breathing (on the sacrificer)
  • SB 3.2.4.14 …having offered the whole milk…
  • BU 1.4.17 So even today when one is single, one has the desire: “I wish I had a wife so I could father offspring. I wish I had wealth so I could perform rites.” As long as someone has not obtained either of these, he considers himself to be utterly incomplete. Now, this is his completeness—his mind (manas) is the atman
  • BU 4.5.13 As a mass of salt has no distinctive core and surface; the whole thing is a single mass of flavor—so indeed, my dear, this atman has no distinctive core and surface; the whole thing is a single mass of cognition (prajñā).

Unfortunately in buddhist circles ‘kasina’ became a thing, for some teachers it means automatically a ‘disc’. This is not at all justified by its normal use of language. ‘Whole’, ‘complete’, ‘full’ is what it means and refers to some sort of boundless conception, meditation or ayatana.

2 Likes

Splendid finds!

Guess what Olivelle (following Gonda) suggests for the rendition of sarvaṃ. It’s “the Whole”. This might explain why the All is placed after the Brahman attainments in MN 1, given that BAU 1.4.9 suggests that the All is a stage further than Brahman.

The EA translators were apparently aware of this connotation, choosing to render sarvaṃ as 悉具足 (completely full) in EA 44.6.

Personally, I am not unsympathetic to the Vsm presentation of the Totalities. If we look at the generation of very specific Form Aggregates as a result of developing the first 8 kasiṇas recorded in SA 109, I think we can tie this back to an important sutta which proposes the conditionality of the Form Aggregate on Form : SN 22.82. There cannot be the Form Aggregate without consciousness of Form.

Whether or not the texts could be interpreted to validate the Vsm method of using discs, I really don’t know. For me, my breath is my wind kasiṇa.

3 Likes

You should get really disturbed, enough to finally examine and get over that seemingly emotional negative bias against things Visuddhimagga etc.

3 Likes

Would you like to start another thread about sarva & sabba in the meditation context? I haven’t seen a good treatment of ‘the All’ that occurs in the suttas (and beyond)…

2 Likes