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Am I wrong to say that one should not crave the state of no craving(nibbana)?

Because that’s a circular reasoning
It’s like if one said “I think I am not thinking”

Instead of craving nibbana can we just undone all of our current craving to the aggregates and others ?

What do you think ?

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SN51.15
"Master Ānanda, the path is endless, not finite. For it’s not possible to give up desire by means of desire.”

“Well then, brahmin, I’ll ask you about this in return, and you can answer as you like. What do you think, brahmin? Have you ever had a desire to walk to the park, but when you arrived at the park, the corresponding desire faded away?”

“Yes, sir.”

“Have you ever had the energy to walk to the park, but when you arrived at the park, the corresponding energy faded away?”

“Yes, sir.”

“Have you ever had the idea to walk to the park, but when you arrived at the park, the corresponding idea faded away?”

“Yes, sir.”

“Have you ever inquired regarding a walk to the park, but when you arrived at the park, the corresponding inquiry faded away?”

“Yes, sir.”

“In the same way, take a mendicant who is perfected—with defilements ended, who has completed the spiritual journey, done what had to be done, laid down the burden, achieved their own true goal, utterly ended the fetters of rebirth, and is rightly freed through enlightenment. They formerly had the desire to attain perfection, but when they attained perfection the corresponding desire faded away. They formerly had the energy to attain perfection, but when they attained perfection the corresponding energy faded away. They formerly had the idea to attain perfection, but when they attained perfection the corresponding idea faded away. They formerly inquired regarding attaining perfection, but when they attained perfection the corresponding inquiry faded away.

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Ok so I am wrong again lol

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It is growth in the training of the Noble One to recognize a mistake for what it is, deal with it properly, and commit to restraint in the future. (SN16.6)

:slightly_smiling_face:

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The desire to achieve wholesome things like virtue and wisdom is totally opposed to sensual desire. The will or desire to succeed (chanda) should be extremely ardent and strong. See A Manual of the Requisites of Enlightenment by the late Venerable Ledi Sayādaw.

Chanda means the zeal or desire to obtain, desire to attain, desire to reach, desire to fulfil, desire to accomplish. The desire indicated here is extreme or excessive desire. There is nothing within or without one’s personality that can obstruct that desire. It is the kind of desire that evokes the thought, “If I do not attain this accomplishment in this life, I shall not rest content. It is better that I die rather than that I shall not attain it.”

It is the kind of desire nurtured by King Dhammasoṇḍa⁷⁰ of Benares during the time of the Kassapa Buddha,⁷¹ when the king said to himself, “What use is there in my being king of Benares if I do not get the opportunity of hearing a discourse of the Kassapa Buddha?” The king, therefore, relinquished his throne and went out in search of one who could repeat to him a discourse of the Kassapa Buddha, no matter that the discourse consisted of a short stanza only. Such desire is appeased if it is fulfilled, as in the case of King Bimbisāra,⁷² Visākhā, and Anāthapiṇḍika.⁷³ It is only when there are faint indications that the desire can be attained, but is not fulfilled, that the mind becomes troubled, and thoughts arise that it is better to die than live without attaining the desire. Examples of such desire existed also in King Temiya,⁷⁴ King Hatthipāla,⁷⁵ and kings, nobles, and rich men in the time of the Buddha who discarded their palaces, retinues and other luxuries to live the lives of bhikkhus in the Buddha’s dispensation.

Viriya means right effort together with its four characteristics (see The Four Right Efforts). Those with this kind of effort are infused with the thought that the aim can be attained by energy and effort. They are not discouraged even though told that they must undergo great hardships. They are not discouraged even though they actually have to undergo great hardships. They are not discouraged even though told that they must put forth effort for many days, months, and years. They are not discouraged even though they actually have to put forth effort for such long periods.

Those who are weak in energy recoil from their task when confronted with work requiring great energy and effort. They shrink when told that they will have to stay apart from friends and associates. They shrink from the prospect of the necessity to be frugal in sleep and food. They shrink from the prospect of long periods of concentration.

Citta (literally thought) means inquisitiveness to gain attainments when one comes in contact with the dispensation and hears the Dhamma. It is curiosity that is extremely ardent and strong.

Although one lives amidst the beauties and luxuries of the world, amidst acquired powers and fortunes, amidst the sacred books and the study of them, one is not allured, but one’s mind is always turned towards the attainments. One attains satisfaction and tranquillity only when one’s mind is absorbed in matters connected with the attainments. It is like the inquisitive­ness of the alchemist engaged in the transmutation of base metals into gold or silver. Alchemists have no interest in anything else but alchemy. They forget to eat or sleep, or whether they have eaten or slept. They do not notice anything when out walking. Citta is great absorption of this nature.

Vimaṃsa (investigation) means: wisdom that can clearly perceive the greatness of the suffering of hell and that attendant on the round of rebirths. It is insight that can clearly perceive the advantages and benefits of the attainments. It is knowledge that can dwell on the deep and difficult teachings, and on their nature. One who possesses such knowledge can no longer find pleasure in any worldly pursuit, but only in the pursuit of the attainments. He or she finds gratification only in the acquisition of deep and profound attainments. The more profound they are, the greater is the desire to attain them.

Those who are endowed with any one of these four bases of success (iddhipāda) can no longer, during this life, admit or plead inability and remain without putting forth effort in the establishment of body contemplation (kāyagatāsati) and the higher stages of the dispensation such as the seven purifications. It is only those who have never possessed even one of these bases of success, and who cannot differentiate between the shallowness and profoundness of life, between the superficiality and depth of the dhamma, who admit or plead inability and remain without making any effort.

One endowed with even one of these four bases of success can achieve the attainments, according to the maturity of the perfections, until reaching the supramundane attainments, in this very life or as a deva in the next. The cases of those endowed with two, three, or all four need no lengthy explanation.

Those who do not possess even one of the bases of success, should attempt to acquire one or other of them. They admit or plead inability only because they have no desire to acquire the higher benefits of the dispensation, such as the four foundations of mindfulness. They should regard this very admission of inability as a highway to the lower realms. Thus, they should study and ponder over the discourses that can arouse zeal. They should approach a teacher who can arouse zeal and rely on him.

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