The whole of the Path in 2 sentences or less - Sutta quotes

Sādhu—yes, thank you! :pray:

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Dhp 1, first verse

Mind precedes thoughts, mind is their chief, their quality is made by mind,
if with a base mind one speaks or acts,
through that suffering follows him like a wheel follows the ox’s foot.
Mind precedes thoughts, mind is their chief, their quality is made by mind,
if with pure mind one speaks or acts,
through that happiness follows him like a shadow which does not depart.

SuttaCentral.

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“Whatever is not yours, abandon it. When you have abandoned it, that will lead to your welfare and happiness.” —SN35.101

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This is one of my favourites (and I guess it counts as two sentences):

Ayaṁ loko santāpajāto,
Phassapareto rogaṁ vadati attato;
Yena yena hi maññati,
Tato taṁ hoti aññathā.

Aññathābhāvī bhavasatto loko,
Bhavapareto bhavamevābhinandati;
Yadabhinandati taṁ bhayaṁ,
Yassa bhāyati taṁ dukkhaṁ;
Bhavavippahānāya kho,
Panidaṁ brahmacariyaṁ vussati.
Ud 3.10

This world, born in torment,
overcome by contact, speaks of disease as the self.
For whatever it thinks it is, it turns out to be something else.

The world is attached to existence, overcome by existence,
taking pleasure only in existence, yet it becomes something else.
What it enjoys, that is the fear;
what it fears, that is the suffering.
But this spiritual life is led
in order to give up existence.

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Not exactly the summary of path in two sentences…but find it very appealing…the last words of Buddha

“vaya dhamma sankhara” (conditioned things are subject to decay)
“appamaadena sampaadetha” (Do what is to be done without delay)

DN16

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I don’t think this famous one has come up yet …


SC 15
“In that case, Bāhiya, you should train yourself thus: In what is seen there must be only what is seen, in what is heard there must be only what is heard, in what is sensed there must be only what is sensed, in what is cognized there must be only what is cognized. This is the way, Bāhiya, you should train yourself.

SC 16 “And since for you, Bāhiya, in what is seen there will be only what is seen, in what is heard there will be only what is heard, in what is sensed there will be only what is sensed, in what is cognized there will be only what is cognized, therefore, Bāhiya, you will not be with that; and since, Bāhiya, you will not be with that, therefore, Bāhiya, you will not be in that; and since, Bāhiya, you will not be in that, therefore, Bāhiya, you will not be here or hereafter or in between the two—just this is the end of suffering.”

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So, great king, you should train like this: ‘I will have good friends, companions, and associates.’ That’s how you should train. —SN3.18

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“Our teacher explains the removal of desire and lust for form, feeling, perception, choices, and consciousness.”
SN 22.2

“Form, feeling, perception, choices, and consciousness are impermanent. Form, feeling, perception, choices, and consciousness are not-self. All conditions are impermanent. All things are not-self.”
MN 35

“All conditions are impermanent. […] All conditions are suffering. […] All things are not-self.”
AN 3.136

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“Gotami, the qualities of which you may know, ‘These qualities lead to passion, not to dispassion; to being fettered, not to being unfettered; to accumulating, not to shedding; to self-aggrandizement, not to modesty; to discontent, not to contentment; to entanglement, not to seclusion; to laziness, not to aroused persistence; to being burdensome, not to being unburdensome’: You may categorically hold, ‘This is not the Dhamma, this is not the Vinaya, this is not the Teacher’s instruction.’

“As for the qualities of which you may know, ‘These qualities lead to dispassion, not to passion; to being unfettered, not to being fettered; to shedding, not to accumulating; to modesty, not to self-aggrandizement; to contentment, not to discontent; to seclusion, not to entanglement; to aroused persistence, not to laziness; to being unburdensome, not to being burdensome’: You may categorically hold, ‘This is the Dhamma, this is the Vinaya, this is the Teacher’s instruction.’”

AN8.53

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And the Master went on to say, “Thus, sire, reflect how meet it is that kinsfolk at any rate should be united, and lovingly dwell together in concord and unity.” His lesson ended, the Master identified the Birth by saying, “The Buddha’s followers were the fairies of those days, and I myself the wise fairy.”
-74. Rukkhadhamma Jātaka.

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the link for the jataka that Bodhisattva has given above is here SuttaCentral.

Thankyou to all who have posted :pray: A beautiful mornings reading

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Does anyone know what ‘meet’ means in this context? I guess it means ‘good’, but it’s a bit obscure.

And just as a little counterbalance, sn1.3:

For practice if one finds a friend—
prudent, well-behaved, and wise,
mindful, joyful, live as one
all troubles overcoming.

But if you do not find a friend—
prudent, well-behaved, and wise,
then like a king who leaves his conquered lands,
fare singly as the rhino’s horn.

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When in contact with pleasure or pain
in village or wilderness,
don’t take it as yours or as others’.
Contacts make contact
dependent on a sense of acquisition.
Where there’s no sense of acquisition,
contacts would make contact
with what?(Ud 2.4)

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Snp 3.12 Dvayatanupassanasutta - Observation of dualities

The unattached one wavers not,
But the one attached, clinging on,
Does not get beyond Samsara,
Which is an alteration between a this-ness and an otherwise-ness.

Knowing this peril,
The great danger, in attachments or supports;
Let the Monk fare along mindfully,
Resting on nothing, clinging to nothing.

Translation by Bhikkhu K Nanananda

“Anissito na calati,
Nissito ca upādiyaṁ;
Itthabhāvaññathābhāvaṁ,
Saṁsāraṁ nātivattati.

Etamādīnavaṁ ñatvā,
Nissayesu mahabbhayaṁ;
Anissito anupādāno,
Sato bhikkhu paribbajeti.

Translation by Bhante Sujato in the link
SuttaCentral.

It is a lovely sutta, giving a different slant on dependent arising, and this is just a little gem from it :pray: :slight_smile:

Happy Thursday :sunflower:

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“Mendicants, sometimes a mendicant pays heed, pays attention, engages whole-heartedly, and lends an ear to the teaching. At such a time the five hindrances are absent, and the seven awakening factors are fully developed” - MN46.38

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My latest favorite—I think it hasn’t been mentioned yet:

DN16:6.10.10-13:
“Aniccā vata saṅkhārā,
“Oh! Conditions are impermanent,
uppādavayadhammino;
their nature is to rise and fall;
Uppajjitvā nirujjhanti,
having arisen, they cease;
tesaṁ vūpasamo sukho”ti.
their stilling is true bliss.”

Also found in DN 17 at the very end.

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SN22.59:

“This is not mine, I am not this, this is not my self.”

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Imho this Sutta seems to describe the entire path for training for liberation like a google map description !!

MN39

When their mind has become immersed in samādhi like this—purified, bright, flawless, rid of corruptions, pliable, workable, steady, and imperturbable—they extend it toward knowledge of the ending of defilements. They truly understand: ‘This is suffering’ … ‘This is the origin of suffering’ … ‘This is the cessation of suffering’ … ‘This is the practice that leads to the cessation of suffering.’ They truly understand: ‘These are defilements’ … ‘This is the origin of defilements’ … ‘This is the cessation of defilements’ … ‘This is the practice that leads to the cessation of defilements.’ Knowing and seeing like this, their mind is freed from the defilements of sensuality, desire to be reborn, and ignorance. When they’re freed, they know they’re freed. They understand: ‘Rebirth is ended, the spiritual journey has been completed, what had to be done has been done, there is no return to any state of existence.’

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Just wanted to resurrect this thread with some pithy sayings I have found both funny and inspirational. :slight_smile: I sense an echo of Ajahn Liem in them… If anyone has similar quotes in mind I would live to hear them!

AN 2.6. When you keep seeing things that are prone to being fettered as boring, you give up greed, hate, and delusion. When these are given up, you’re freed from rebirth, old age, and death, from sorrow, lamentation, pain, sadness, and distress. You’re freed from suffering, I say.

Thag 10.3
It’s not a teaching just for today;
it isn’t incredible or amazing.
When you’re born, you die—
what’s amazing about that?

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Anicca, Dukkha, Anatta.

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