The whole of the Path in 2 sentences or less - Sutta quotes

Seeing danger in the slightest fault.

AN 9.1

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"How many conditions are there for the arising of right view?”

“There are two conditions for the arising of right view: the words of another and proper attention. …"

MN43:

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There is a quote attributed to the Buddha–and a famous one at that–that eludes me. However, I think it (more or less) goes as follows:

“To abandon the unwholesome,
to cultivate the wholesome,
and to tame one’s mind:
This is the teaching of all Tathāgathas.”

I do, however, come back to a particularly poignant, though arguably/intentionally liberal, translation of the Buddha’s last words (vayadhammā sankhārā…) by Bhante Yuttadhammo:

“Stuff breaks–sober up.” :blush: :pray:

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Welcome to the forum @Tanakaro :slight_smile:

Just to put it in the context of the Suttas - The quote you give alludes to the Noble 8Fold Path. Which is the 4th factor of the 4 Noble Truths - It is found throughout the suttas. Here is an example of one place you can find it :slight_smile:

Setting the wheel of Dhamma in Motion sutta (Dhammacakkappavattanasutta) SN56.11

“And what, bhikkhus, is that middle way awakened to by the Tathagata, which gives rise to vision … which leads to Nibbāna? It is this Noble Eightfold Path; that is, right view, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration. This, bhikkhus, is that middle way awakened to by the Tathagata, which gives rise to vision, which gives rise to knowledge, which leads to peace, to direct knowledge, to enlightenment, to Nibbāna.
SuttaCentral.
“Now this, bhikkhus, is the noble truth of the way leading to the cessation of suffering: it is this Noble Eightfold Path; that is, right view …(all 8 factors) … right concentration.

The Noble 8 Fold Path is the foundation of all practice and presented throughout the suttas in many ways, and it shows how to

and later in the same sutta it addresses this

This is what the Blessed One said. Elated, the bhikkhus of the group of five delighted in the Blessed One’s statement. And while this discourse was being spoken, there arose in the Venerable Kondañña the dust-free, stainless vision of the Dhamma: “Whatever is subject to origination is all subject to cessation.”

Thankyou for your contribution :slight_smile: and I hope you enjoy the forum as a doorway to discover the suttas :pray: :smiley: :dharmawheel:

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Thank you for the welcome, friend!

I think there may be some misunderstanding, though— by “eludes me,” I was not referring to the meaning but, rather, the *exact placement * within the Canon (I think it can be found in the Dhammapada, but possibly somewhere else in the Canon and/or associated with a post-canonical, commentarial story associated with said Dhammapada verse?).

I appreciate the reminder of the meaning, but not necessary! No need to expound the Noble Eightfold Path—lord, the amount of times I have chanted the Dhammacakkhapavattina Sutta with my pal Bhante Sumano!

Indeed—that ever-frequent “all that arises ceases” that follows the opening of the Dhamma Eye/moment of streamentry is in the Buddha’s final exhortation concerning the nature of phenomena, but what I love so much about Bhante Yuttadhammo’s translation—as silly on the face is it might seem—is that particular approach to “appamada” in the Inst. declension. Whereas most would translate it in a sort adverbial use of “diligence/vigilance” when, as some might argue, appamada could be understood as the opposite of pamada(tthana), or intoxication. Thus, appamada is clarity of mind: sobriety. Thus, “sober up”! :blush:

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Hello @Tanakaro. The quote you’re after is from the Dhammapada, verse 183

Translated by Bhante Sujato as:
Not to do any evil;
to embrace the good;
to purify one’s mind:
this is the instruction of the Buddhas.

It is on a plaque at the base of a large Buddha rupa at Dhammaloka, the city centre which the Buddhist Society of Western Australia operates from.

It really sums up the teaching for me too! :slightly_smiling_face:

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Sādhu—yes, thank you! :pray:

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Dhp 1, first verse

Mind precedes thoughts, mind is their chief, their quality is made by mind,
if with a base mind one speaks or acts,
through that suffering follows him like a wheel follows the ox’s foot.
Mind precedes thoughts, mind is their chief, their quality is made by mind,
if with pure mind one speaks or acts,
through that happiness follows him like a shadow which does not depart.

SuttaCentral.

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“Whatever is not yours, abandon it. When you have abandoned it, that will lead to your welfare and happiness.” —SN35.101

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This is one of my favourites (and I guess it counts as two sentences):

Ayaṁ loko santāpajāto,
Phassapareto rogaṁ vadati attato;
Yena yena hi maññati,
Tato taṁ hoti aññathā.

Aññathābhāvī bhavasatto loko,
Bhavapareto bhavamevābhinandati;
Yadabhinandati taṁ bhayaṁ,
Yassa bhāyati taṁ dukkhaṁ;
Bhavavippahānāya kho,
Panidaṁ brahmacariyaṁ vussati.
Ud 3.10

This world, born in torment,
overcome by contact, speaks of disease as the self.
For whatever it thinks it is, it turns out to be something else.

The world is attached to existence, overcome by existence,
taking pleasure only in existence, yet it becomes something else.
What it enjoys, that is the fear;
what it fears, that is the suffering.
But this spiritual life is led
in order to give up existence.

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Not exactly the summary of path in two sentences…but find it very appealing…the last words of Buddha

“vaya dhamma sankhara” (conditioned things are subject to decay)
“appamaadena sampaadetha” (Do what is to be done without delay)

DN16

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I don’t think this famous one has come up yet …


SC 15
“In that case, Bāhiya, you should train yourself thus: In what is seen there must be only what is seen, in what is heard there must be only what is heard, in what is sensed there must be only what is sensed, in what is cognized there must be only what is cognized. This is the way, Bāhiya, you should train yourself.

SC 16 “And since for you, Bāhiya, in what is seen there will be only what is seen, in what is heard there will be only what is heard, in what is sensed there will be only what is sensed, in what is cognized there will be only what is cognized, therefore, Bāhiya, you will not be with that; and since, Bāhiya, you will not be with that, therefore, Bāhiya, you will not be in that; and since, Bāhiya, you will not be in that, therefore, Bāhiya, you will not be here or hereafter or in between the two—just this is the end of suffering.”

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So, great king, you should train like this: ‘I will have good friends, companions, and associates.’ That’s how you should train. —SN3.18

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“Our teacher explains the removal of desire and lust for form, feeling, perception, choices, and consciousness.”
SN 22.2

“Form, feeling, perception, choices, and consciousness are impermanent. Form, feeling, perception, choices, and consciousness are not-self. All conditions are impermanent. All things are not-self.”
MN 35

“All conditions are impermanent. […] All conditions are suffering. […] All things are not-self.”
AN 3.136

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“Gotami, the qualities of which you may know, ‘These qualities lead to passion, not to dispassion; to being fettered, not to being unfettered; to accumulating, not to shedding; to self-aggrandizement, not to modesty; to discontent, not to contentment; to entanglement, not to seclusion; to laziness, not to aroused persistence; to being burdensome, not to being unburdensome’: You may categorically hold, ‘This is not the Dhamma, this is not the Vinaya, this is not the Teacher’s instruction.’

“As for the qualities of which you may know, ‘These qualities lead to dispassion, not to passion; to being unfettered, not to being fettered; to shedding, not to accumulating; to modesty, not to self-aggrandizement; to contentment, not to discontent; to seclusion, not to entanglement; to aroused persistence, not to laziness; to being unburdensome, not to being burdensome’: You may categorically hold, ‘This is the Dhamma, this is the Vinaya, this is the Teacher’s instruction.’”

AN8.53

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And the Master went on to say, “Thus, sire, reflect how meet it is that kinsfolk at any rate should be united, and lovingly dwell together in concord and unity.” His lesson ended, the Master identified the Birth by saying, “The Buddha’s followers were the fairies of those days, and I myself the wise fairy.”
-74. Rukkhadhamma Jātaka.

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the link for the jataka that Bodhisattva has given above is here SuttaCentral.

Thankyou to all who have posted :pray: A beautiful mornings reading

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Does anyone know what ‘meet’ means in this context? I guess it means ‘good’, but it’s a bit obscure.

And just as a little counterbalance, sn1.3:

For practice if one finds a friend—
prudent, well-behaved, and wise,
mindful, joyful, live as one
all troubles overcoming.

But if you do not find a friend—
prudent, well-behaved, and wise,
then like a king who leaves his conquered lands,
fare singly as the rhino’s horn.

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When in contact with pleasure or pain
in village or wilderness,
don’t take it as yours or as others’.
Contacts make contact
dependent on a sense of acquisition.
Where there’s no sense of acquisition,
contacts would make contact
with what?(Ud 2.4)

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Snp 3.12 Dvayatanupassanasutta - Observation of dualities

The unattached one wavers not,
But the one attached, clinging on,
Does not get beyond Samsara,
Which is an alteration between a this-ness and an otherwise-ness.

Knowing this peril,
The great danger, in attachments or supports;
Let the Monk fare along mindfully,
Resting on nothing, clinging to nothing.

Translation by Bhikkhu K Nanananda

“Anissito na calati,
Nissito ca upādiyaṁ;
Itthabhāvaññathābhāvaṁ,
Saṁsāraṁ nātivattati.

Etamādīnavaṁ ñatvā,
Nissayesu mahabbhayaṁ;
Anissito anupādāno,
Sato bhikkhu paribbajeti.

Translation by Bhante Sujato in the link
SuttaCentral.

It is a lovely sutta, giving a different slant on dependent arising, and this is just a little gem from it :pray: :slight_smile:

Happy Thursday :sunflower:

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