Typos in MN10 and DN22

The subtitle after this paragraph

The noble truth of the cessation of suffering

should be

4.5.3. The noble truth of the cessation of suffering

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Didn’t want to create a new topic for minor issues. Here’s an extra semicolon in DN22

The Section about Applying the Mind to Repulsiveness is Finished

;

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I am confused about the Pali title of MN10, is it Satipatthanasutta or Mahā­sati­paṭṭhā­na­sutta?

Thanks @fxam. I have changed the two typos.
Indeed the title of MN10 should be Sati­paṭṭhā­na­sutta and not Mahā­sati­paṭṭhā­na­sutta.

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Thanks, I wonder if the Pali text in MN10 is the correct version, it has the word Mahā­sati­paṭṭhā­na­suttaṃ near the end.

Good point - I will check it.

In the Burmese edition which we use for SC, the Majjhima version (MN10) was replaced with the Digha version (DN22). This happened, I think, at the 5th Council, or at any rate it is attested in the late 19th century. It’s unfortunate that we have this version on SC, but the text is, on the whole, by far the best edited and most consistent Pali text, so we use it with its quirks. We don’t have the resources to re-edit the whole canon.

What I’d suggest is to wrap the extra portions of MN10 in class="add".

Remember that we can’t use divs or spans across <p> boundaries, so we have to do something like:

<p>text text text <span class="add">text text</span></p>
<div class="add">
<p>text …</p>
<p>text …</p>
</div>
<p><span class="add">text text</span>text text</p>

or else

<p>text text text <span class="add">text text</span></p>
<p><span class="add">text text</span></p>
<p><span class="add">text text</span></p>
<p><span class="add">text text</span>text text</p>

but not

<p>text text text <div class="add">text text</span></p>
<p>text …</p>
<p>text …</p>
<p>text text</div>text text</p>

It’s done for both the Pali and English versions.

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Thanks. I was looking for the differences between the two Suttas, so the extra portion in Mahā­sati­paṭṭhā­na­sutta is the description of the Four Noble Truths.

There are singular-plural inconsistencies (I hope this phrase is correct) in MN10

Here, a monastic has gone to a wilderness, or to the root of a tree, or to an empty building. They sit down in the meditation posture, with their body erect, and focus their mindfulness right there. Mindful, they breath in; mindful, they breath out.

Furthermore, monastics, when a monastic is walking they clearly know ‘I am walking’; when standing they clearly know ‘I am standing’; when sitting they clearly know ‘I am sitting’; and when lying down they clearly know ‘I am lying down’. Whatever posture their body is in, they clearly know it.

(and many more)

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this is gender neutral approach of Ven Sujato, because it’s his translation

more details are available in WIKIPEDIA: Singular they

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Yes, a singular “they” is standard usage in modern English.

It’s interesting that the Wikipedia article mentions that opposition to the singular “they” was a relatively recent obsession by certain pedants (along with split infinitives, and a number of other perfectly good constructions).

i personally didn’t come across it used in any texts, other than this Wikipedia article, let alone being heard in colloquial usage

that’s not to dismiss the form, just an observation

It’s the standard way of dealing with gender neutrality in my country, and my organisation (a University in New Zealand). Otherwise our regulations would be full of ugly “he/she should do X…” expressions.

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I learned something today :smiley:

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http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2012/06/he-or-she-versus-they/

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Singular “they” was chosen as “Word of the Year” by the American Dialect Society.:

The use of singular they builds on centuries of usage, appearing in the work of writers such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Jane Austen. In 2015, singular they was embraced by the Washington Post style guide. Bill Walsh, copy editor for the Post, described it as “the only sensible solution to English’s lack of a gender-neutral third-person singular personal pronoun.”

While editors have increasingly moved to accepting singular they when used in a generic fashion, voters in the Word of the Year proceedings singled out its newer usage as an identifier for someone who may identify as “non-binary” in gender terms.

“In the past year, new expressions of gender identity have generated a deal of discussion, and singular they has become a particularly significant element of that conversation,” Zimmer said. “While many novel gender-neutral pronouns have been proposed, they has the advantage of already being part of the language.”

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