Why are monks that eat only one meal a day overweight?

I think the better related discussion would be how could Buddhist rules and community behavior be updated to keep monastics healthier.

I would suggest allowing three meals a day. I know the intermittent fasting people will jump on me, but I think it is healthier to spread your food out. Being able to eat later in the day would also stop bad workarounds like drinking chocolate, buttered tea, sweet fizzy drinks, etc.

Having community talks to provide food that is more appropriate for mostly non-sedantary people.

Providing exercise equipment like stationary bicycles, elliptical machines, etc. Perhaps even small gyms in the larger monasteries.

The increased community expenditures in these areas will lower medical costs in the long term.

These things will also help monastics stay healthier mentally as well as physically.

It will also keep the monastics alive longer, enabling them to talk, write, and otherwise serve the community longer.

Everyone wins.

1 Like

Or they could be trying to teach clueless people good manners. Which obviously isn’t working. Or really worth my time, I suppose.

3 Likes

Lol. Funny indeed… I’m just reflecting on this passage again on MN 125.

… “In the same way, Prince Jayasena dwells in the midst of sensual pleasures, enjoying them, consumed by thoughts of them, burning with fever for them, and eagerly seeking more.

It’s simply impossible for him to know or see or realize what can only be known, seen, and realized by renunciation.

Good luck.

Perhaps they’re not spending endless time speculating about such things. Thinking a lot certainly burns a lot of calories.

On a more important note, let’s treat our sangha with respect and perhaps spend more time on our own practice.

5 Likes

I’m just reflecting on this passage:

AN 4.65 Appearance

“Mendicants, these four people are found in the world. What four? There are those whose estimation of and confidence in others is based on appearance, on eloquence, on mortification, and on principle.

These are the four people found in the world.

Those who judge on appearance,
and those swayed by a voice,
are full of desire and greed;
those people just don’t understand.

Not knowing what’s inside,
nor seeing what’s outside,
the fool shut in on every side,
gets carried away by a voice.

Not knowing what’s inside,
but seeing what’s outside,
seeing the fruit outside,
they’re also carried away by a voice.

Understanding what’s inside,
and seeing what’s outside,
seeing without hindrances,
they don’t get carried away by a voice.”

6 Likes

I think also they eat breakfast and some eat cheese and chocolate in the evening.

Haha…

The above sutta is about regular appearance. Without any references to senses restraint.

But the question is being fat due to indulgence in senses (such as tongue and body) such as eating too much. These are 2 different subjects.

This mean a person join a monkhood from thin, then the body grow become fat.

Like I said, ask the monk why they are fat. See how they response, then you can proceed with your path.

Btw, if one has reached and maintained sati/samadhi level for 24/7, it is impossible for the body to grow anymore because one has been freed from 5 senses. No desire to indulgence in 5 senses due to Sati and unification of mind.

But most people still under 5 senses influences/defilements. If you know what I meant, Good luck.

Calories in vs calories out.
This is why anyone gains weight.
An hour of exercise burn only 300 calories, but you can eat 300 calories in 30 seconds.
At our monastery we are fortunate to have anagarikas and kitchen stewards who supplement our very rich dāna with steamed vegetables etc and some regulars have noticed this is the kind of food we finish off.
We have the benefit of being able to serve ourselves. At some places I’ve stayed the lay supporters will put food in to the monastics bowls which means you wind up with more food in your bowl than you need, once the food is in your bowl you are much more likely to eat it.

7 Likes