Make a rainbow fall at our feet 🌈 tell us about our mistakes, typos, and other oversights

MN54:16.4: sace so gijjho vā kaṅko vā kulalo vā taṁ maṁsapesiṁ na khippameva paṭinissajjeyya, so tatonidānaṁ maraṇaṁ vā nigaccheyya maraṇamattaṁ vā dukkhan”ti?
MN54:16.4: If that vulture, crow, or hawk doesn’t quickly let go of that scrap of meat, wouldn’t that result in death or deadly suffering for them?”

Everywhere else this is “deadly pain”, not “deadly suffering”.


AN2.63:1.1: “Yasmiṁ, bhikkhave, adhikaraṇe ubhato vacīsaṁsāro diṭṭhipaḷāso cetaso āghāto appaccayo anabhiraddhi ajjhattaṁ avūpasantaṁ hoti, tasmetaṁ, bhikkhave, adhikaraṇe pāṭikaṅkhaṁ:
“In a disciplinary issue, when both sides continue to bring up settled issues—with contempt for each other’s views, resentful, bitter, and exasperated—is not settled internally, you can expect that this disciplinary issue will be
AN2.63:1.2: ‘dīghattāya kharattāya vāḷattāya saṁvattissati, bhikkhū ca na phāsuṁ viharissanti’.
long, fractious, and troublesome, and the mendicants won’t live comfortably.

Somehow the syntax here seems wrong; not sure how it should actually be. Perhaps “If a disciplinary issue … is not settled internally”?

The same again in AN 2.63:2.1.

Also compare

AN2.63:1.2: ‘dīghattāya kharattāya vāḷattāya saṁvattissati, bhikkhū ca na phāsuṁ viharissanti’.
long, fractious, and troublesome, and the mendicants won’t live comfortably.

with

AN2.63:2.2: ‘na dīghattāya kharattāya vāḷattāya saṁvattissati, bhikkhū ca phāsuṁ viharissantī’”ti.
won’t lead to lasting acrimony and enmity, and the mendicants will live comfortably.”

“will be long, fractious, and troublesome” as opposed to “won’t lead to lasting acrimony and enmity”.


In AN 7.56, the term uttari nissaraṇaṁ is once translated “escape beyond” (segment 6.1), and another time “higher escape” (segment 6.4).


Comment to MN 56:30.3:

Upāli is playing on the dual senses of vaṇṇa as both “praise” and “beauty”. In doing so, he implicitly answers the Buddha’s question: he is adept at poetic improvisation (paṭibhāna).

It’s not the Buddha’s question, but the Jain Ñātika’s.


The phrase seyyathāpi nāma balavā puriso dīghalomikaṁ eḷakaṁ lomesu gahetvā ākaḍḍheyya parikaḍḍheyya samparikaḍḍheyya; evamevāhaṁ samaṇaṁ gotamaṁ vādena vādaṁ ākaḍḍhissāmi parikaḍḍhissāmi samparikaḍḍhissāmi is translated

  • in MN 35: “I’ll take him on in debate and drag him to and fro and round about, like a strong man would grab a long-fleeced sheep by its fleece and drag it to and fro and round about!”
  • in MN 56: “I’ll take him on in debate and drag him to and fro and round about, like a strong man would drag a fleecy sheep to and fro and round about!”

MN56:10.3: Yathā taṁ sutavatā sāvakena sammadeva satthusāsanaṁ ājānantena evamevaṁ dīghatapassinā nigaṇṭhena bhagavato byākataṁ.
The Honorable Tapassī has answered the ascetic Gotama like a learned disciple who rightly understands their teacher’s instructions.

Should be: “The Jain ascetic Dīgha Tapassī has answered the Buddha …”. The wording is not exactly the same in the different occurrences in this sutta.

It’s interesting that Upāli addresses the Buddha right from the beginning in a respectful way, such as Buddhists would do, not Jains. Already in his first sentence he uses bhante, and here he uses bhagavato.


MN56:29.4: Pabhinnakhīlassa vijitavijayassa;
rid of barrenness, victor in battle;

I am wondering: is khīla not rather a pillar? Barrenness is khila, as far as I understand it. So: “the pillar broken, victor in battle”?


purindada is mostly translated “Purindada the Firstgiver” (SN11.12, SN11.13, MN56), but in DN20 it is “Purindada the Fortbreaker”.


Note to MN57:1.2:

The Koliyans were south-eastern neighbors of the Sakyans, with whom they had close ties in marriage and customs. | Haliddavasana (“yellow-clothes”) is also the scene of sn45.54, which discusses similarities and differences between Buddhism and wanderers when it comes to meditation.

It’s not SN45.54, but SN46.54.

Your recent translation makes many of the suttas very clear and understandable for someone who finds them normally very difficult to comprehend, Venerable Sujato. Thank you very much for all of your hard work in translating them. Your translations are invaluable.

2 Likes