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Translation of siṁsapāvane

DN23:1.3:
Tatra sudaṁ āyasmā kumārakassapo setabyāyaṁ viharati uttarena setabyaṁ siṁsapāvane.
He stayed in the grove of Indian Rosewood to the north of Setavyā.

Bhante @sujato has translated siṁsapāvane as “Indian Rosewood”. The CPED says it’s murraya exotica, synonym: murraya paniculata.

For none of them I can see the name “Indian Rosewood”. Where does it come from?

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It may mean different trees, but my Sanskrit dictionary says it refers to Dalbergia Sisoo, often called Indian Rosewood, so that’s the reason I translate siṁśapā that way, since it agrees with other sources and grew in northern India.

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Ah, thank you! That might be the same source where Bhante Sujato has it from.

If the choice is between members of the Dalbergia and the Murraya genuses, I should think the former would be much more likely. Murrayas are rather small and a group of them would be more of a shrubbery than a forest. Since they wouldn’t provide any canopy it’s hard to imagine why bhikkhus would want to live in the midst of them. (Unless of course they’d been set a challenge by the knights who say “Ni!”).

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Oh my goodness … ! Me who has never watched any such movie! :laughing:

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A handful of leaves:

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