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#123

The pacittiyas for bhikkhunis only

(rules 89-96 of 96)

This is the last batch of the pacittiya rules… :tada:

  1. Bathing with scented sesame powder
  2. Being massaged by another bhikkhuni
  3. Being massaged by a sikkhamana
  4. Being massaged by a samaneri
  5. Being massaged by a laywoman
  6. Sitting down in front of a bhikkhu without permission
  7. Asking a bhikkhu a dhamma or vinaya question without permission
  8. Going into the village without one’s vest.


split this topic #124

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#125

The Patidesaniyas

Patidesaniyas are offenses that can be cleared through confession, similar to a pacittiya. The difference is that the monastics have to use a specific confession formula to clear the offense: “I have done a blameworthy and unsuitable thing which is to be acknowledged. I acknowledge it.”
There are 4 patidesaniyas for bhikkhus, 8 for bhikkhunis. None of them are shared.


The patidesaniyas for bhikkhus only

(rules 1-4 of 4)

  1. Eating food received from a bhikkhuni
  2. Not sending a bhikkhuni away when she is organizing a meal distribution for the monks
  3. Eating food from families who have been designated by the sangha as “in training” (i.e. should not be approached for alms, because they give so much that they can barely survive themselves)
  4. Living in a dangerous place and having laypeople deliver food there without telling them of the dangers.

The full text of the rules can be found here.


split this topic #126

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#139

The patidesaniyas for bhikkhunis only

(Rules 1-8 of 8)

  1. Requesting and eating ghee
  2. … Oil
  3. … Honey
  4. … Sugar
  5. … Fish
  6. … Meat
  7. … Milk
  8. … Curds.

(If this seems familiar, it is parallel to bhikkhu pacittiya 39 :slight_smile:)


#140

Is the offence “requesting and eating” or “requesting or eating?”. I cook exclusively with ghee, so it is a bit confusing to see that ghee is bad.


#141

Please keep cooking with ghee! Ghee is good! :grinning:

Ghee belongs to a group of food that is considered even especially good, and monastics are not supposed to ask for that extra food and then eat it. This is considered being demanding and difficult to support.

If they don’t ask for it and are given some ghee there is no problem eating it.


#142

Whew! Thanks for the clarification. :pray:


#143

Isn’t requesting for these foods bad only after 12 noon?


#144

No, the time of the day has no influence on the offense.
As Anagarika @Sabbamitta explained, the problem is that these foods are considered special, not that monastics ate them in the afternoon.

The list of afternoon allowables is similar but not quite the same: butter, ghee, oil, honey, and sugar.


#145

The sekhiyas

The sekhiyas are the most minor class of offenses. There are 75 sekhiyas in total, and all of them are shared between bhikkhus and bhikkhunis.
The sekhiyas vary widely between the different early schools which is an indication that they may be a late addition to the patimokkhas.
They mostly deal with monastic etiquette, and cover things like appropriate behavior in town, table manners, and how to teach dhamma.

A full list can be found here.


(Rules 1-8 of 75)

  1. Wearing the lower robe evenly around
  2. Wearing the upper robe evenly around
  3. Walking well covered in inhabited areas
  4. Sitting well covered in inhabited areas
  5. Not fiddling around with hands and feet while walking in inhabited areas
  6. Not fiddling around with hands and feet while sitting in inhabited areas
  7. Walking with eyes lowered in inhabited areas
  8. Sitting with eyes lowered in inhabited areas


#146

Somebody’s been ulra-picky, or is there a good reason for this rule :grimacing:.

It doesn’t matter, if it isn’t inhabited, right? Or does that fact that someone was watching meant it was actually inhabited!


#147

These are rules for appropriate behavior in public. So they don’t apply in uninhabited places, wilderness areas, private kutis etc.

Monastics are supposed to look calm and composed in public, to be inspiring and a good “advertisement” for the dhamma. What exactly do you find strange about this rule?

The word sekhiya is related to sekkha, “trainee/learner”. Basically, these rules are trainings in sense restraint and mindfulness. The offense is only committed if you break them out of disrespect. If you break them because of lack of mindfulness, there’s no problem. You just keep on training. :slightly_smiling_face:


#149

I mistook inhabited, for uninhabited?! :grimacing:


#150

The Sekhiyas

(rules 9-16 of 75)

  1. Walking with robes hitched up in inhabited areas
  2. Sitting with robes hitched up in inhabited areas
  3. Laughing loudly while walking in inhabited areas
  4. Laughing loudly while sitting in inhabited areas
  5. Making noise while walking in inhabited areas
  6. Making noise while sitting in inhabited areas
  7. Swaying the body while walking in inhabited areas
  8. Swaying the body while sitting in inhabited areas


#151

Interestingly, it is this prohibition that led me to not swing my arms while walking meditation. That prohibition has proven fruitful.


#152

:grin:
There’s exactly that rule on the next doodle:
Swinging the arms while walking in inhabited areas.


#153

The Sekhiyas

(rules 17-24 of 75)

  1. Swinging the arms while walking in inhabited areas
  2. Swinging the arms while sitting in inhabited areas
  3. Swaying the head while walking in inhabited areas
  4. Swaying the head while sitting in inhabited areas
  5. Walking with arms akimbo in inhabited areas
  6. Sitting with arms akimbo in inhabited areas
  7. Walking with the head covered in inhabited areas
  8. Sitting with the head covered in inhabited areas.


#154

Is ‘the head covered’ here, referring to a hat or something like a turban, or a robe.


#155

I was confused too, and have discussed this with Ajahn Brahmali a little while ago… :grin:

The Pali word here is ogunṭhita which refers to any kind of head cover.

There’s another sekhiya, no. 66, that is specifically about cloth that is wrapped around the head, such as turbans. That’s called veṭhita in Pali.